Latch meaning

lăch
To fasten or close with a latch.
verb
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The definition of a latch is a hook, bar or other mechanism that causes a door or cupboard to close and stay closed.

A metal bar that keeps a gate from opening is an example of a latch.

noun
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Latch is defined as to fasten something closed.

When you close a gate and fasten a metal bar to keep it from opening, this is an example of when you latch the gate.

verb
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A fastening for a window, etc.
noun
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To have or be closed with a latch.
verb
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To shut tightly so that the latch is engaged.

A door too warped to latch.

verb
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A fastening for a door or gate, esp. one capable of being worked from either side by means of a lever and consisting of a bar that drops into a notch in a piece attached to the doorjamb or gatepost.
noun
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A spring lock on a door; specif., a night latch.
noun
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An electronic circuit that maintains one of two states. See flip-flop.
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A fastening for a door that has a bar that fits into a notch or slot, and is lifted by a lever or string from either side.
noun
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To close or lock as if with a latch.
verb
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To catch; lay hold of.

verb
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(obsolete) To smear; to anoint.

verb
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A fastening, as for a door or gate, typically consisting of a bar that fits into a notch or slot and is lifted from either side by a lever or string.
noun
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A spring lock, as for a door, that is opened from the outside by a key.
noun
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To close or lock with a latch.
verb
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latch on to
  • To get hold of; obtain:
    Latched on to a fortune in the fur trade.
  • To cling to.
idiom
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latch on to
  • to seize or grasp
  • to comprehend or embrace (an idea, etc.)
  • to attach oneself to in a manner regarded as assertive, presumptuous, etc.
    Tried to latch on to her big sister's circle of friends.
idiom
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on the latch
  • fastened by the latch but not locked or bolted
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

latch on to
latch on to

Origin of latch

  • Middle English latche from lacchen to seize from Old English læccan

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English latche (“a latch"), from lacchen (“to seize"), from Old English læċċan (“to grasp, take hold of, catch, seize"), from Proto-Germanic *lakjanÄ…, *lakwijanÄ…, *lakkijanÄ… (“to seize"), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)lag-, *(s)lagw- (“to take, seize").

    From Wiktionary

  • Compare French lécher (“to lick").

    From Wiktionary