Itch definition

ĭch
An irritating skin sensation causing a desire to scratch.
noun
3
1
Any of various skin disorders, such as scabies, marked by intense irritation and itching.
noun
2
1
A restless desire or craving for something.

An itch to travel.

noun
2
1
A restless desire; hankering.

An itch to travel.

noun
1
1
To have a persistent, restless craving.
verb
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0
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To feel, have, or produce an itch.
verb
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0
To have a desire to scratch.
verb
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0
To cause to itch.
verb
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0
To scratch (an itch).
verb
0
0
To feel or cause an irritating sensation on the skin that makes one want to scratch the affected part.
verb
0
0
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To have a restless desire or hankering.
verb
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0
To make itch.
verb
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To irritate or annoy.
verb
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0
verb
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0
An irritating skin sensation causing a desire to scratch.
noun
0
0
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Any of various skin disorders, such as scabies, marked by intense irritation and itching.
noun
0
0
To feel, have, or produce an itch.
verb
0
0
To scratch an itch.
verb
0
0
A sensation felt on an area of the skin that causes a person or animal to want to scratch.
noun
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0
A desire or want.
noun
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(intransitive) To feel itchy; to feel a need to be scratched.
verb
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(intransitive) To want or desire.

He started learning to drive and he has been itching for opportunities to practice ever since.

verb
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To cause to feel an itch.

verb
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0
(colloquial) To scratch or rub so as to relieve an itch.
verb
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0
An irritating sensation on the skin that makes one want to scratch the affected part.
noun
1
2
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the itch
  • any of various skin disorders accompanied by severe irritation of the skin, as scabies
idiom
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0

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
itch
Plural:
itches

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

the itch

Origin of itch

  • Middle English yicche from Old English gicce from giccan to itch

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • The verb is from Middle English icchen, ȝicchen, from Old English ġiċċan, ġyċċan (“to itch”), from Proto-Germanic *jukjaną (“to itch”), of unknown origin. Cognate with Scots yeuk (“to itch”), West Frisian jûkje (“to itch”), Dutch jeuken (“to itch”), Low German jocken (“to itch”), German jucken (“to itch”).

    From Wiktionary

  • The noun is from Middle English icche, ȝicche, from Old English ġiċċe, ġyċċe (“an itch”), from Proto-Germanic *jukjǭ (“an itch”), of unknown origin. Cognate with Scots yeuk (“an itch, itchiness”), Dutch jeuk (“an itch”).

    From Wiktionary