Benchmark meaning

bĕnchmärk
A standard by which something can be measured or judged.
noun
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To measure the performance of (an item) relative to another similar item in an impartial scientific manner.
verb
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The definition of a benchmark is to measure something against a standard.

An example of benchmark is to compare a recipe to the original chef's way of doing it.

verb
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A benchmark is defined as a standard by which all others are measured.

An example of a benchmark is a novel that is the first of its genre.

noun
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A surveyor's mark made on a stationary object of previously determined position and elevation and used as a reference point, as in geologic surveys or tidal observations.
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A performance test of hardware and/or software. There are various programs that very accurately test the raw power of a single machine, the interaction in a single client/server system (one server/multiple clients) and the transactions per second in a transaction processing system. However, it is next to impossible to benchmark the performance of an entire enterprise network with a great degree of accuracy.Benchmarks may change their rating scale with new releases of the software. Thus, the same version of the test must often be run to compare results. See PC Magazine benchmarks, BAPCo, ECperf, Linpack, Dhrystone, Whetstone, Khornerstone, SPEC, GPC and RAMP-C.
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A tool for evaluating the performance of a company, department, or individual by comparing its performance to a set of standards. Benchmarks may be cited in terms of numbers, such as sales figures. They also may have to do with meeting specific goals.
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A standard by which something is evaluated or measured.
noun
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A surveyor's mark made on some stationary object and shown on a map; used as a reference point.
noun
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To measure (a rival's product) according to specified standards in order to compare it with and improve one's own product.
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(computing) A computer program that is executed to assess the performance of the runtime environment.
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Origin of benchmark

  • From the use of the surveyor's mark as a place to insert an angle iron that serves as a bench or level surface, for the support for a leveling rod

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From bench +"Ž mark. Originally (attested circa 1842) a mark cut into a stone by land surveyors to secure a "bench" (from 19th century land surveying jargon, meaning a type of bracket), to mount measuring equipment. Figurative sense attested circa 1884.

    From Wiktionary