Belly definition

bĕlē
To swell out; curve out; bulge.
verb
3
1
The deep interior.

The belly of a ship.

noun
1
0
The front part or underside of anything.
noun
1
0
The womb; the uterus.
noun
0
0
A deep or central interior space.

The engine in the belly of a ship; fish down in the belly of a river.

noun
0
0
Advertisement
The stomach.
noun
0
0
An appetite for food.
noun
0
0
A part that bulges or protrudes.

The belly of a sail.

noun
0
0
(anatomy) The bulging, central part of a muscle.
noun
0
0
To bulge or cause to bulge.
verb
0
0
Advertisement
The lower front part of the human body between the chest and thighs; abdomen.
noun
0
0
The underside of an animal's body.
noun
0
0
The abdominal cavity.
noun
0
0
The stomach.
noun
0
0
An appetite for food.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
Any part, surface, or section that curves outward or bulges, as the swelling part of a sail in the wind, the fleshy middle part of a muscle, or the upper surface of a violin.
noun
0
0
(archaic) The womb.
noun
0
0
(informal) The stomach.
noun
0
0
The womb; the uterus.
noun
0
0
The bulging, central part of a muscle.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
The abdomen.

noun
0
0
The stomach, especially a fat one.
noun
0
0
The womb.
noun
0
0
The lower fuselage of an airplane.
noun
0
0
The part of anything which resembles the human belly in protuberance or in cavity; the innermost part.

The belly of a flask, muscle, sail, or ship.

noun
0
0
Advertisement
(architecture) The hollow part of a curved or bent timber, the convex part of which is the back.
noun
0
0
To position one's belly.
verb
0
0
(intransitive) To swell and become protuberant; to bulge.
verb
0
0
To cause to swell out; to fill.
verb
0
0
The underside of the body of certain vertebrates, such as snakes and fish.
noun
0
1
Advertisement
belly up
  • to stand or step close as to a counter or railing
idiom
0
0
(slang) go belly up
  • to die
  • to fail; often, specif., to become bankrupt
idiom
0
0

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
belly
Plural:
bellies

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of belly

  • Middle English beli from Old English belg bag bhelgh- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old English bælġ. Probably originally from Proto-Indo-European *bhle- (“to swell, blow up”)

    From Wiktionary