Beer meaning

bîr
The definition of beer is an alcoholic beverage generally made from malted grain, flavored with hops or a carbonated soft drink made with flavor from roots or other parts of a plant.

Bud Light, Corona and Coors are each an example of beer.

Root and ginger are each an example of a beer type.

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A beverage made from extracts of roots and plants.

Birch beer.

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A serving of one of these beverages.
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A beverage made from extracts of roots and plants.

Birch beer.

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A serving of one of these beverages.
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An alcoholic beverage made from grain, esp. malted barley, fermented by yeast and flavored with hops; esp., such a beverage produced by slow fermentation at a relatively low temperature.
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Any of several soft drinks made from extracts of roots and plants.

Ginger beer.

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(uncountable) An alcoholic drink fermented from starch material commonly barley malt, often with hops or some other substance to impart a bitter flavor.

Beer is brewed all over the world.

I love beer but I know it is bad for you.

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(uncountable) A fermented extract of the roots and other parts of various plants, as spruce, ginger, sassafras, etc.
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(uncountable) A solution produced by steeping plant materials in water or another fluid.
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(countable) A glass, bottle, or can of any of the above beverages.

I bought a few beers from the shop for the party.

Can I buy you a beer?

I'd like two beers and a glass of white wine.

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(countable) A variety of the above beverages.

Amstel is one of the most commonly sold beers in Europe.

I haven't tried this beer before.

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One who is or exists.
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Origin of beer

  • Middle English ber from Old English bēor from West Germanic probably from Latin bibere to drink pō(i)- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Middle English ber from Old English bēor from West Germanic probably from Latin bibere to drink pō(i)- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English bere, from Old English bēor (“beer”), from Proto-Germanic *beuzą (“beer”), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰews-, *bews- (“dross, sediment, brewer's yeast”). Cognate with West Frisian bier (“beer”), German Low German Beer (“beer”), Dutch bier (“beer”), German Bier (“beer”), Icelandic bjór (“beer”), Swedish buska (“freshly brewed beer, new beer”), Middle Dutch & Middle Low German būsen (“to feast, booze, drink heavily”), Middle High German būs (“a swelling”). Non-Germanic cognates include probably Albanian mbush (“to fill, stuff”). More at booze.
    From Wiktionary
  • From Middle English beere, equivalent to be +‎ -er.
    From Wiktionary