Rotate meaning

rō'tāt
To turn around on an axis or center.
verb
1
0
Having the parts spreading out like a wheel; wheel-shaped.

A rotate spicule or scale; a rotate corolla.

adjective
1
0
(of crops) To grow or plant in a certain order.
verb
1
1
To rotate is to turn something around a central point, or to take turns.

An example of rotate is to move the tires around on a car to new positions on the car to let them wear evenly.

An example of rotate is moving the players in a volleyball game.

verb
0
0
To proceed in sequence; take turns or alternate.

Interns will rotate through the various departments.

verb
0
0
Advertisement
To cause to turn on an axis or center.
verb
0
0
Having radiating parts; wheel-shaped.
adjective
0
0
To turn around or cause to turn around a center point or axis; revolve.
verb
0
0
To go or cause to go in a regular and recurring succession of changes; take, or cause to take, turns.

To rotate crops.

verb
0
0
Shaped like a wheel, with radiating parts, as the corolla of some flowers.
adjective
0
0
Advertisement
(intransitive) To spin, turn, or revolve.

He rotated in his chair to face me.

verb
0
0
(intransitive) To advance through a sequence; to take turns.

The nurses' shifts rotate each week.

verb
0
0
(intransitive, of aircraft) To lift the nose, just prior to takeoff.

The aircraft rotates at sixty knots.

verb
0
0
To spin, turn, or revolve something.

Rotate the dial to the left.

verb
0
0
To advance something through a sequence.
verb
0
0
Advertisement
To replace older materials or to place older materials in front of newer ones so that older ones get used first.

The supermarket rotates the stock daily so that old foods don't sit around.

verb
0
0

Origin of rotate

  • Latin rotāre rotāt- from rota wheel ret- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Latin rotātus, perfect passive participle of rotō (“revolve"), from rota (“wheel").
    From Wiktionary