Ray meaning

Frequency:
The definition of a ray is a fish with a skeleton mostly made of cartilage, a flat body with eyes on the top surface, wide fins and a whip-like tail.

An example of a ray is what killed Steve Irwin the Crocodile Hunter.

noun
2
0
Ray is defined as a beam coming from a light source.

An example of ray is the light coming in through a window on a sunny day.

noun
2
0
A structure or part having the form of a straight line extending from a point, such as:
  • Any of the bright streaks that are seen radiating from some craters on the moon.
  • A ray flower or the strap-shaped portion of the corolla of a ray flower.
  • A branch of an umbel.
  • One of the bony spines supporting the membrane of a fish's fin.
  • One of the arms of a starfish or other radiate animal.
noun
2
0
A small amount; a trace.

Not a ray of hope left.

noun
0
0
(mathematics) A straight line extending from a point.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
To send out as rays; emit.
verb
0
0
To supply with rays or radiating lines.
verb
0
0
To cast rays on; irradiate.
verb
0
0
Any of various cartilaginous fishes of the superorder Batoidea, having ventral gill slits, enlarged pelvic fins that are fused to the sides of the head, and a flattened body, and including the stingrays, skates, and guitarfishes.
noun
0
0
Any of various members of this superorder having a whiplike tail usually with a stinging spine, such as a stingray, considered in contrast to a guitarfish, sawfish, or skate.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
A disclosure of mental or spiritual enlightenment.

A ray of intelligence.

noun
0
0
A tiny amount; slight trace.

A ray of hope.

noun
0
0
To shine forth in rays.
verb
0
0
To radiate.
verb
0
0
To send out in rays; emit.
verb
0
0
Advertisement
To supply with rays or radiating lines.
verb
0
0
Any of several orders (esp. Rajiformes) of cartilaginous fishes with a horizontally flat body, both eyes on the upper surface, widely expanded fins at each side, and a slender or whiplike tail, as the eagle rays, electric rays, and skates.
noun
0
0
(person, proper) A masculine name.
noun
0
0
(person) (born Emmanuel Radnitsky) 1890-1976; U.S. painter & photographer.
proper name
0
0
(person) 1921-92; Indian film writer & director.
proper name
0
0
Advertisement
A thin line or narrow beam of light or other radiation.
0
0
A geometric figure consisting of the part of a line that is on one side of a point on the line.
0
0
A thin beam of radiant energy, especially light.
0
0
A beam of light or radiation.

I saw a ray of light through the clouds.

noun
0
0
(zoology) A rib-like reinforcement of bone or cartilage in a fish's fin.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
(zoology) One of the spheromeres of a radiate, especially one of the arms of a starfish or an ophiuran.
noun
0
0
(botany) A radiating part of a flower or plant; the marginal florets of a compound flower, such as an aster or a sunflower; one of the pedicels of an umbel or other circular flower cluster; radius.
noun
0
0
(mathematics) A line extending indefinitely in one direction from a point.
noun
0
0
(colloquial) A tiny amount.

Unfortunately he didn't have a ray of hope.

noun
0
0
To emit something as if in rays.
verb
0
0
Advertisement
(intransitive) To radiate as if in rays.

verb
0
0
A marine fish with a flat body, large wing-like fins, and a whip-like tail.
noun
0
0
(now rare) To dress, array (someone). [from 14th c.]

verb
0
0
The name of the letter ⟨/⟩, one of two which represent the r sound in Pitman shorthand.
noun
0
0
(obsolete) Array; order; arrangement; dress.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
(music) Alternative form of re.
noun
0
0
A surname from a Middle English nickname meaning a king or a roe.
pronoun
0
0
A diminutive of the male given name Raymond, also used as a formal given name.
pronoun
0
0
A diminutive of the female given name Rachel, more often spelled Rae.
pronoun
0
0

Origin of ray

  • Middle English raye from Old French raie from Latin raia

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Old French rai from Latin radius

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From its sound, by analogy with the letters chay, jay, gay, kay, which it resembles graphically.

    From Wiktionary

  • Via Middle English, from Old French rai, from Latin radius (“staff, stake, spoke").

    From Wiktionary

  • Old French raie, from Latin raia.

    From Wiktionary

  • Shortened from array.

    From Wiktionary

  • Alternative forms.

    From Wiktionary