Radiation meaning

rādē-āshən
Radiation is the process of sending off energy in the form of light, heat, x-rays or nuclear particles.

An example of radiation are the energy waves off of a nuclear bomb.

An example of radiation is the energy in the atmosphere monitored by radiation detectors such as the Xetex brand of personal radiation detector which were ultimately discontinued in the 1990s.

noun
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The act or process of radiating.

The radiation of heat and light from a fire.

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The act or process of radiating; specif., the process in which energy in the form of rays of light, heat, etc. is sent out through space from atoms and molecules as they undergo internal change.
noun
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The act or process of the spreading out of energy in rays.
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Radial arrangement of parts.
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(anatomy) Radial arrangement of parts, as of a group of nerve fibers connecting different areas of the brain.
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The shooting forth of anything from a point or surface, like the diverging rays of light; as, the radiation of heat.
noun
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(anatomy) Radial arrangement of parts, as of a group of nerve fibers connecting different areas of the brain.
noun
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The emission, or outward flow, of energy in the form of electromagnetic waves, including radio waves and photons. See also electromagnetic, photon, and waveform.
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The process of radiating waves or particles.
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The transfer of energy via radiation (as opposed to convection or conduction).
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Radioactive energy.
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Adaptive radiation.
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The rays sent out; radiant energy.
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(nuclear physics) Energy emitted as electromagnetic waves, as gamma or X-rays, or as energetic nuclear particles, as neutrons, alpha and beta particles, etc.
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The act or process of radiating.

The radiation of heat and light from a fire.

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The use of such energy, especially x-rays, in medical diagnosis and treatment.
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Origin of radiation

  • From Latin radiatio.

    From Wiktionary