Array meaning

ə-rā
An orderly grouping or arrangement, esp. of troops.
noun
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An ordered arrangement of data items. A vector is a one dimensional array; a matrix is a two-dimensional array. Arrays are used in myriad applications from basic database processing to scientific simulation. Most programming languages support arrays by providing indexes into the data. For example, with indexes starting at zero, the hypothetical programming statement Employee[4][9] points to the fifth record (row) and tenth data item (column) of an employee array. See subscript, index and data item.
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Numerical data ordered in a linear fashion, by magnitude.
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A group of memory elements accessed by one or more indices.
noun
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A group of people called into court at the same time for potential jury duty. From such a group the members of a jury or juries will be selected. The members of such a group who are empaneled to be a jury. To empanel a jury for a trial. The list of empaneled jurors. To call out the names of the jurors as each is empaneled.
verb
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He was arrayed in his finest robes and jewels.

verb
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(law) To set in order, as a jury, for the trial of a cause; that is, to call them one at a time.

verb
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Clothing and ornamentation.

noun
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A collection laid out to be viewed in full.
noun
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An orderly series, arrangement or sequence.
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Order; a regular and imposing arrangement; disposition in regular lines; hence, order of battle.

Drawn up in battle array.

noun
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(programming) Any of various data structures designed to hold multiple elements of the same type; especially, a data structure that holds these elements in adjacent memory locations so that they may be retrieved using numeric indices.
noun
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(law) A ranking or setting forth in order, by the proper officer, of a jury as impanelled in a cause; the panel itself; or the whole body of jurors summoned to attend the court.
noun
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The definition of an array is a group of persons or things displayed in a pattern.

A formation of soldiers is an example of an array.

A rainbow of colors is an example of an array of colors.

noun
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To array is defined as to display objects in an orderly or decorative way.

To line-up floats in a parade is an example of array.

verb
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To set out for display or use; place in an orderly arrangement.

Arrayed the whole regiment on the parade ground.

verb
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To dress, especially in fine clothes; adorn.
verb
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An orderly, often imposing arrangement.

An array of royal jewels.

noun
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An impressively large number, as of persons or objects.

An array of heavily armed troops; an array of spare parts.

noun
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Splendid attire; fine clothing.
noun
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To place in order; marshal (troops for battle, etc.)
verb
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To dress in fine or showy attire; deck out.
verb
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Troops in order; military force.
noun
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Fine clothes; finery.
noun
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A group of two or more logically related elements, identified by a single name and usually stored in consecutive storage locations in main memory.
noun
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A systematic arrangement of numbers or symbols in rows and columns.
noun
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A rectangular arrangement of quantities in rows and columns, as in a matrix.
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To lay out in an orderly arrangement; to deploy or marshal.
verb
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A large collection.
  • 2011 October 23, Phil McNulty, “Man Utd 1 - 6 Man City”, BBC Sport.
    Mario Balotelli, in the headlines for accidentally setting his house ablaze with fireworks, put City on their way with goals either side of the interval as United struggled to contain the array of attacking talent in front of them.

We offer a dazzling array of choices.

noun
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Origin of array

  • Middle English arraien from Anglo-Norman arraier from Vulgar Latin arrēdāre reidh- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English arrayen, from Anglo-Norman arayer (compare Old French arayer, areer (“to put in order”)), from Medieval Latin arrēdō (“to put in order, arrange, array”), from Medieval Latin *rēdum (“preparation, order”), from Frankish *reida (“preparation, order”) or Gothic (garaids, “ready, prepared”), from Proto-Germanic *raidaz, *raidiz (“ready”), from Proto-Indo-European *reidʰ- (“to put in order, ease, make comfortable”). Cognate with Old High German gireiti (“preparation”), Old Frisian rēde (“ready”), Old English ġerǣde (“preparation, equipment”). More at ready.

    From Wiktionary