Robe meaning

rōb
(US) The skin of an animal, especially the bison, dressed with the fur on, and used as a wrap.
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(archaic) Clothes; costume; dress.
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To dress in or cover with a robe or robes.
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A long loose outer garment, often signifying honorary stature.
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To clothe someone in a robe.
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A long loose flowing outer garment, especially:
  • An official garment worn on formal occasions to show office or rank, as by a judge or high church official.
  • An academic gown.
  • A dressing gown or bathrobe.
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Clothes; apparel.
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A blanket or covering made of material, such as fur or cloth.

A lap robe.

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To cover or dress in a robe or in something that functions like a robe.

Fields that were robed with snow.

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To put on a robe or robes.
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A long, loose or flowing outer garment.
  • Such a garment worn on formal occasions, to show rank or office, etc., as by a judge or bishop.
  • A bathrobe or dressing gown.
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Origin of robe

  • Middle English from Old French robe booty, movable personal possessions like clothing, robe of Germanic origin reup- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English robe, roobe, from Old French robe, robbe, reube (“booty, spoils of war, robe, garment”), from Frankish *rouba, *rauba (“booty, spoils, stolen clothes”, literally “things taken”), from Proto-Germanic *raubō, *raubaz, *raubą (“booty, that which is stripped or carried away”), from Proto-Indo-European *reup- (“to tear, peel”). Akin to Old High German roup ("booty"; Modern German Raub (“robbery, spoils”)), Old High German roubōn ("to rob, steal"; Modern German rauben (“to rob”)), Old English rēaf (“spoils, booty, dress, armour, robe, garment”), Old English rēafian (“to steal, deprive”). More at rob, reaf, reave.

    From Wiktionary