Tunic definition

to͝onĭk, tyo͝o-
Frequency:
A loose-fitting garment, sleeved or sleeveless, extending to the knees and worn by men and women especially in ancient Greece and Rome.
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A natural covering of a plant, animal, etc.
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(anatomy) A coat or layer enveloping an organ or part.
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The definition of a tunic is a long, loose-fitting garment such as a loose shirt worn over pants, or is a tight-fitting short coat that is part of some military and police uniforms.

A long, loose fitting top worn over a skirt is an example of a tunic.

A short coat worn by a police officer is an example of a tunic.

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A long, plain, close-fitting jacket, usually having a stiff high collar and worn as part of a uniform.
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A loose-fitting women's garment that falls to the hip or thigh and is often worn over leggings or pants.
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(botany) A loose membranous outer covering of a bulb or corm, as of an onion, tulip, or crocus.
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A medieval surcoat.
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A loose, gownlike garment worn by men and women in ancient Greece and Rome.
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A blouselike garment extending to the hips or lower, usually gathered at the waist, often with a belt.
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(chiefly brit.) A short coat forming part of the uniform of soldiers, policemen, etc.
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A vestment worn over the alb, as formerly by a subdeacon, or by a bishop under the dalmatic.
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(anatomy) A coat or layer enveloping an organ or part.
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A garment worn over the torso, with or without sleeves, and of various lengths reaching from the hips to the ankles.
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
tunic
Plural:
tunics

Origin of tunic

  • Middle English tunik from Old French tunique from Latin tunica of Phoenician origin Hebrew kuttōnet, kətōnet from Central Semitic kuttān, *kittān chiton

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle French tunique, from Latin tunica, possibly from Semitic; see also Aramaic [script?] (kittuna), Hebrew כותנתה (kuttoneth, “coat"); or from Etruscan. Existed in Old English as "tunece"; unknown if term was lost and then reborrowed later.

    From Wiktionary