Tunicate meaning

to͝onĭ-kĭt, -kāt, tyo͝o-
Any of various chordate marine animals of the subphylum Urochordata (or Tunicata), having a cylindrical or globular body enclosed in a tough outer covering and a notochord in the larval stage, and including the sea squirts and salps.
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Of or relating to the tunicates.
adjective
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Having a tunic.
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Having a tunic, as the bulb of an onion.
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Of or covered with concentric layers or tunics, as an onion.
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Having a tunic or mantle.
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Any of a subphylum (Tunicata) of solitary or colonial sea chordates, having a saclike body enclosed by a thick tunic, including the salps and ascidians.
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Any of various primitive marine chordate animals of the subphylum Tunicata, having a rounded or cylindrical body that is enclosed in a tough outer covering. Tunicates start out life as free-swimming, tadpolelike animals with a notochord (a primitive backbone), but many, such as the sea squirts, lose the notochord and most of their nervous system as adults and become fixed to rocks or other objects. Tunicates often form colonies.
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Any of very many chordate marine animals, of the subphylum Tunicata or Urochordata, including the sea squirts.
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Of or pertaining to these animals.
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(anatomy, botany) Enclosed in a tunic or mantle; covered or coated with layers.
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(zoology) Having each joint buried in the preceding funnel-shaped one, as in certain antennae of insects.
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Origin of tunicate

  • Latin tunicātus past participle of tunicāre to clothe with a tunic from tunica tunic tunic

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Latin tunicatus, past participle of tunicare (“to clothe with a tunic").

    From Wiktionary