Most meaning

mōst
In or to the highest degree or extent. Used with many adjectives and adverbs to form the superlative degree.

Most honest; most impatiently.

adverb
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(informal) Almost.

Most everyone agrees.

adverb
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Most.

Innermost.

suffix
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Nearest to.

Aftmost.

suffix
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Greatest in number.
adjective
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In the greatest number of instances.

Most fish have fins.

adjective
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Very.

A most impressive piece of writing.

adverb
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Greatest in amount, quantity, or degree.
adjective
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In the greatest number of instances.

Most fame is fleeting.

adjective
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The greatest amount, quantity or degree.

To take most of the credit.

noun
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In or to the greatest degree or extent.

Most horrible, most quickly.

adverb
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Very (often preceded by a)

A most beautiful morning.

adverb
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(informal) Almost; nearly.
adverb
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Forming superlatives.

Hindmost.

affix
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Superlative form of many.

Most bakers and dairy farmers have to get up early.

adverb
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Most is defined as to the highest or greatest level.

An example of most is when the racing is more challenging than any others which have been run in the past.

adverb
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Most means the greatest number of something.

An example of most is the ten people who decided to go to a party versus the four people who decided to stay home.

noun
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The definition of most is the majority or the greatest amount, degree or size.

An example of most is a student who receives an "A" grade 98 percent of the time.

An example of most is the heaviest cat out of the litter.

adjective
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(Media Oriented Systems Transport) An in-vehicle, ring-based digital network for up to 64 A/V devices from the MOST Coopertion standards organization. Widely used, MOST supports fiber, unshielded twisted pair and coax cables at speeds of 25, 50 and 150 Mbps. Specifications for all seven layers of the network stack (layers 1 through 7) are provided.MOST devices include a video display, CD/DVD player, security system, digital radio, integrated cellphone, microphone, amplifier, speakers and GPS navigation. See automotive systems and automotive Ethernet.
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Superlative form of much.

Most people like chocolate.

Most simply choose to ignore it.

Most want the best for their children.

determiner
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Superlative form of much.

Most of the world's water is salty.

adverb
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(With a definite article) Forms the superlative of many adjectives.

This is the most important example.

adverb
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To a great extent or degree; highly; very.

The terms below need to be checked and allocated to the definitions (senses) of the headword above. Each term should appear in the sense for which it is appropriate. Use the template {{sense|"gloss"}}, substituting a short version of the definition for "gloss".

adverb
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(uncountable) The greatest amount.

The most I can offer for the house is $150,000.

noun
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(countable) A record-setting amount.
noun
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The greatest amount or degree.

She has the most to gain.

noun
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(slang) The greatest, best, or most exciting. Used with the:

That party was the most!

noun
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The greatest part or number.

Most of the town was destroyed. Most of the books were missing.

pronoun
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at (the) most
  • At the maximum:
    We saw him for ten minutes at the most. She ran two miles at most.
idiom
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at (the) most
  • at the very limit; not more than
idiom
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make the most of
  • to make the greatest use of; take fullest advantage of
idiom
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the most
  • the best or most exciting, attractive, etc.
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of most

  • ME, altered (after most) < -mest < OE < older superl. suffixes, -ma + -est

    From Webster's New World College Dictionary, 5th Edition

  • Middle English alteration (influenced by most) of -mest from Old English -mo, -ma superlative suff. -est superlative suff

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Old English mǣst, māst mē-3 in Indo-European roots Adv., sense 3, short for almost

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English most, moste, from Old English mǣst, māst, from Proto-Germanic *maistaz, *maist. Cognate with West Frisian meast, Dutch meest, German meist, Danish and Swedish mest, Icelandic mestur.

    From Wiktionary