Merry meaning

mĕrē
Full of cheerfulness, liveliness, and good feelings.

Merry revelers.

adjective
14
0
Brisk.

A merry pace.

adjective
4
1
Marked by or offering fun, good feelings, and liveliness; festive.

A merry evening.

adjective
2
0
(archaic) Delightful or pleasing.
adjective
2
0
Jolly and full of high spirits.

We had a very merry Christmas.

adjective
1
0
Advertisement
The definition of merry is festive, full of laughter or fun.

An example of something merry is a joyous wedding celebration; a merry celebration.

adjective
1
1
Full of fun and laughter; lively and cheerful.
adjective
0
0
Conducive to fun and laughter; festive.

The merry month of May.

adjective
0
0
(archaic) Pleasant or amusing.
adjective
0
0
Festive and full of fun and laughter.

Everyone was merry at the party.

adjective
0
0
Advertisement

The play moved along at a merry pace.

adjective
0
0
(euphemistic) Drunk; tipsy.
adjective
0
0
A surname. Originally a nickname for a merry person.
pronoun
0
0
A female given name from the adjective, also a diminutive of Mary and Mercy.
pronoun
0
0
A male given name, a diminutive of Meredith.
pronoun
0
0
Advertisement
make merry
  • to be festive and full of gaiety; have fun
idiom
0
0

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of merry

  • Middle English merri from Old English mirige pleasant mregh-u- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English merie, mirie, myrie, murie, murȝe, from Old English meriÄ¡e, miriÄ¡e, myriÄ¡e, myreÄ¡e, myrÄ¡e (“pleasing, agreeable; pleasant, sweet, delightful; melodious"), from Proto-Germanic *murguz (“short, slow"), from Proto-Indo-European *mréǵʰus (“short"). Cognate with Scots mery, mirry (“merry"), Old High German murg, murgi ("short, brief"; > German murk (“short, lazy")), Norwegian dialectal myrjel (“small object, figurine"), Latin brevis (“short, small, narrow, shallow").

    From Wiktionary