Lith meaning

lith
Lith is defined as related to a rock or stone.

An example of lith is megalith, a very large stone used in ancient architecture.

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Lithuania.
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Lithuanian.
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Stone implement or structure.

Megalith.

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Mineral concretion; calculus.

Cystolith.

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Lithograph.
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Lithography.
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Lithuania.
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Lithuanian.
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(UK dialectal) A limb; any member of the body.
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(UK dialectal) A joint; a segment or symmetrical part or division.

Lith and limb.

Out of lith.

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(Scotland) A segment of an orange, or similar fruit.
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(UK dialectal) A gate; a gap in a fence.
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Rock; stone.

Xenolith.

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Stone.

Eolith, megalith.

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Origin of lith

  • Fr -lithe < Gr lithos, stone

    From Webster's New World College Dictionary, 5th Edition

  • From Greek lithos stone

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English lith, lyth, from Old English liþ (“limb, member, joint, tip of finger, point"), from Proto-Germanic *liþuz (“limb"), from Proto-Indo-European *(e)lAi- (“to bend"). Cognate with Scots lith (“part of the body, joint"), West Frisian lid (“part of the body, member"), Dutch lid (“limb, member, section"), Middle High German lit (“limb, member"), Swedish led (“joint, link, channel"), Icelandic liður (“item"), Dutch lid (“part of the body; member") and gelid (“joint, rank, file"), German Glied (“limb, member, link").

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English *lith, from Old Norse hlið (“a gap, gate, space"), from Proto-Germanic *hliþą (“door, lid, eyelid"), from Proto-Indo-European *kel- (“to conceal, hide"). Cognate with Norwegian dialectal lid, led (“an opening in a fence"), Scots lith (“a gap in a fence, gate opening"), Old English hlid (“lid, covering, door, gate, opening"). More at lid.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English lith, lyth (“owndom"), from Old Norse lýðr (“people, lede"), from Proto-Germanic *liudiz (“men, people"), from Proto-Indo-European *(e)lewedÊ°- (“man, people"). Cognate with Dutch lieden and lui, German Leute (“people"), Old English lÄ“ode (“people"). More at lede.

    From Wiktionary