Lid meaning

lĭd
A flaplike covering, such as an operculum.
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An ounce of marijuana.
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The definition of a lid is the removable cover of something, or is an action to stop something, or is slang for an ounce of marijuana.

An example of a lid is the top of a can of beans.

An example of a lid is putting a lid on street violence.

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A removable or hinged cover for a hollow receptacle or box.
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An eyelid.
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A curb, restraint, or limit.

Approved a new lid on corporate spending.

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An act of concealment; a cover.

Told us to keep a lid on the report until the campaign was over.

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A hat.
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A movable cover, hinged or unattached, as for a box, trunk, pot, etc.; top.
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A curb or restraint.

To put a lid on illegal gambling.

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A cap, hat, etc.
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A small package of marijuana, usually about an ounce.
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An operculum.
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An eyelid.
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A flaplike covering, such as an operculum.
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The top or cover of a container.
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(slang) A cap or hat.
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(slang) One ounce of cannabis.
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(surfing, slang, chiefly Australia) A bodyboard or bodyboarder.

The rest of us managed to dodge out of control lid riders — Kneelo Knews August 2003 [1]

Mal rider, shortboard or lid everyone surfs like a kook sometimes. — realsurf.com message board 2001 [2]

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(slang) A motorcyclist's crash helmet.
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(slang) In amateur radio, an incompetent operator.
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(abbreviation) Eyelid.
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To put a lid on something.
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Origin of lid

  • Middle English from Old English hlid klei- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Old English hlid, from Proto-Germanic *hlidą (compare Dutch lid, German Lid (“eyelid”), Swedish lid (“gate”)), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱlíto (“post, trimmed log”) (compare Old Norse hlíð (“slope”), Welsh clwyd (“gate, hurdle”), Latin clitellae (“pack saddle”), Lithuanian šlìtė (“ladder”), pã-šlitas (“curved”), Russian калитка (kalitka, “gate”), Ancient Greek ἄκλιτος (áklitos, “stable”), δικλίς (diklís, “double-posted (doors, gates)”), Yazghulami xad 'ladder', Sanskrit श्रित (śrita, “standing on, lying on, being on, fixed on, situated in”), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱley- (“to lean”). More at lean.
    From Wiktionary