Roof meaning

ro͝of, ro͝of
The upper surface of an anatomical structure, especially one having a vaulted inner structure.

The roof of the mouth.

noun
6
2
The top covering of something.

The roof of a car.

noun
4
1
The highest point or limit; the summit or ceiling.

A roof on prices is needed to keep our customers happy.

noun
4
1
The outside top covering of a building.
noun
2
1
To furnish with a roof or cover.
verb
1
1
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Figuratively, a house or home.
noun
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0
The top or peak of anything.

The roof of the world.

noun
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0
Anything like a roof in position or use.

The roof of the mouth.

noun
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0
To provide or cover with or as with a roof.
verb
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0
The upper surface of an anatomical structure, especially one having a vaulted inner structure.

The roof of the mouth.

noun
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0
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The cover at top of a building.
noun
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0
The upper part of a cavity.

The palate is the roof of the mouth.

Archaeologists discovered that the cave's roof was decked with paintings.

noun
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To cover or furnish with a roof.
verb
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(astronomy) A Chinese constellation located near Aquarius and Pegasus, one of the 28 lunar mansions and part of the larger Black Turtle.
pronoun
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(slang) go through the roof
  • To grow, intensify, or rise to an enormous, often unexpected degree:
    Operating costs went through the roof last year.
  • To become extremely angry:
    When I told her about breaking the window, she went through the roof.
idiom
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(slang) raise the roof
  • To be extremely noisy and boisterous:
    They raised the roof at the party.
  • To complain loudly and bitterly:
    Angry tenants finally raised the roof about their noisy neighbors.
idiom
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hit the roof
  • to become suddenly or violently angry
idiom
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(slang) raise the roof
  • to be very noisy, as in applause, anger, celebration, etc.
  • to complain loudly
idiom
0
0
through the roof
  • at or to an extremely high point or level
    A TV show with ratings through the roof.
idiom
0
0

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of roof

  • Middle English from Old English hrōf

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English rof, from Old English hrōf (“roof, ceiling; top, summit; heaven, sky"), from Proto-Germanic *hrōfÄ… (“roof"), from Proto-Indo-European *krāpo- (“roof"), from Proto-Indo-European *krāwǝ- (“to cover, heap"). Cognate with Scots ruif (“roof"), Dutch roef (“a cabin, wooden cover, deckhouse"), Low German rof (“roof"), Icelandic hróf (“a shed under which ships are built or kept, roof of a boathouse").

    From Wiktionary

  • From Mandarin Chinese 危宿 (WÄ“ixiù)

    From Wiktionary