Palate meaning

pălĭt
Frequency:
Your palate is the roof of your mouth, or your preferences for foods and flavors.

The bony and soft parts of the roof of the mouth is an example of your palate.

Your liking of spicy foods is an example of your palate.

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The roof of the mouth in vertebrates having a complete or partial separation of the oral and nasal cavities and consisting of the hard palate and the soft palate.
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The projecting part on the lower lip of a bilabiate corolla that closes the throat, as in a snapdragon.
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The sense of taste.

Delicacies pleasing to the most refined palate.

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The roof of the mouth, consisting of a hard, bony forward part (the hard palate) and a soft, fleshy back part (the soft palate, or velum)
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Sense of taste: the palate was incorrectly thought to be the organ of taste.
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Intellectual taste; liking.
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The bony and muscular partition between the oral and nasal cavities; the roof of the mouth.
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The roof of the mouth in vertebrate animals, separating the mouth from the passages of the nose. &diamf3; The bony part of the palate is called the hard palate. &diamf3; A soft, flexible, rear portion of the palate, called the soft palate, is present in mammals only and serves to close off the mouth from the nose during swallowing.
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(anatomy) The roof of the mouth; the uraniscus.
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The sense of taste.
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(figuratively) Relish; taste; liking (from the mistaken notion that the palate is the organ of taste)
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(figuratively) Mental relish; intellectual taste.

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(botany) A projection in the throat of such flowers as the snapdragon.
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(nonstandard) To relish; to find palatable.
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Origin of palate

  • Middle English from Old French palat from Latin palātum perhaps of Etruscan origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English, from Old French palat, from Latin palātum (“roof of the mouth, palate"), perhaps of Etruscan origin.

    From Wiktionary