Lark meaning

lärk
Frequency:
Lark means a small or medium-sized bird with a very long hind claw and known for its songs.

An example of a lark is the meadowlark.

noun
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A harmless prank.
noun
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A carefree or spirited adventure.
noun
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To engage in spirited fun or merry pranks.
verb
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Any of several similar birds, such as the meadowlark.
noun
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Any of a large family (Alaudidae) of chiefly Old World passerine birds, including the skylark and horned lark.
noun
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The definition of a lark is a prank or a free-spirited adventure.

An example of a lark is leaving a whoopee cushion on someone's chair.

An example of a lark is what the couple were on when they decided to get married in Las Vegas.

noun
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To lark is defined as to have fun and play silly tricks.

An example of lark is to decorate a newlywed's car.

verb
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Any of various birds from other families, as the meadowlark.
noun
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To play or frolic; have a merry time.
verb
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A frolic or spree.
noun
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A merry prank.
noun
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Any of various small, singing passerine birds of the family Alaudidae.
noun
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Any of various similar-appearing birds, but usually ground-living, such as the meadowlark and titlark.
noun
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One who wakes early; one who is up with the larks.
noun
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To catch larks.

To go larking.

verb
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A romp, frolic, some fun.

noun
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noun
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To sport, engage in harmless pranking.
verb
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To frolic, engage in carefree adventure.
verb
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A surname, from lark as a byname or for a catcher and seller of larks.
pronoun
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A patronymic surname shortened from Larkin, a medieval diminutive of Laurence.
pronoun
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A male given name occasionally transferred from the surnames.
pronoun
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A female given name from the lark bird.
pronoun
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Any of various birds of the family Alaudidae, found almost worldwide and having a melodious song, especially the skylark.
noun
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on a lark
  • impulsively; without forethought
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of lark

  • Short for skylark to frolic or alteration of dialectal lake play (from Middle English leik, laik) (from Old Norse leikr)

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English laveroc, larke from Old English lāwerce

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English larke, laverke, from Old English lāwerce, lÇ£werce, lāuricæ, from Proto-Germanic *laiwazikÇ­ (compare dialectal West Frisian larts, Dutch leeuwerik, German Lerche), from *laiwaz (borrowed into Finnish leivo, Estonian lõo), of unknown ultimate origin with no known cognates outside of Germanic.

    From Wiktionary

  • a shortening of skylark (1809), sailors' slang, "play roughly in the rigging of a ship", because the common European larks were proverbial for high-flying; Dutch has a similar idea in speelvogel (“playbird, a person of markedly playful nature").

    From Wiktionary

  • from a northern English dialectal term lake/laik (“to play") (around 1300, from Old Norse leika (“to play (as opposed to work)")), with an intrusive -r- as is common in southern British dialects; or

    From Wiktionary