Frisk meaning

frĭsk
The act of frisking someone.
noun
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To search (a person) for something concealed, especially a weapon, by passing the hands quickly over clothes or through pockets.
verb
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To move about briskly and playfully; frolic.
verb
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An energetic, playful movement; a gambol.
noun
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Lively; frisky.
adjective
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A lively, playful movement; frolic; gambol.
noun
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The act or an instance of frisking a person.
noun
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To move in a playful, lively manner.

The colt frisked its tail.

verb
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To search (a person) as for concealed weapons or stolen articles by passing the hands quickly over the person's clothing.
verb
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To dance or move about in a playful, lively manner; frolic.
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To search another for a weapon or contraband.
noun
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The search of another for a weapon or contraband. See also search.
noun
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adjective
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A frolic; a fit of wanton gaiety; a gambol: a little playful skip or leap.
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verb
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To search somebody by feeling his or her body and clothing.

The police frisked the suspiciously-acting individual and found a knife as well as a bag of marijuana.

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Origin of frisk

  • From Middle English frisk lively from Old French frisque of Germanic origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Alternative etymology derives frisk from an alteration (due to Old French fresche (“fresh”)) of Old French fricque, frique (“smart, strong, playful, bright”), from Gothic [script?] (friks, “greedy, hungry”), from Proto-Germanic *frekaz, *frakaz (“greedy, active”), from Proto-Indo-European *preg- (“greedy, fierce”). Cognate with Middle Dutch vrec (“greedy, avaricious”), German frech (“insolent”), Old English frec (“greedy, eager, bold, daring, dangerous”). More at freak.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English frisk, from Old French frisque (“lively, jolly, blithe, fine, spruce, gay”), of Germanic origin, perhaps from Middle Dutch frisc (“fresh”) or Old High German frisc (“fresh”), ultimately from Proto-Germanic *friskaz (“fresh”). Cognate with Icelandic frískur (“frisky, fresh”). More at fresh.

    From Wiktionary