Lake meaning

lāk
Frequency:
A large inland body of fresh water or salt water.
noun
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The definition of a lake is a natural or man-made body of water that is surrounded by land.

An example of a lake is Lake Erie or Lake Ontario.

noun
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A large pool of liquid.

A lake of spilled coffee on my desk.

noun
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A pigment consisting of organic coloring matter with an inorganic, usually metallic base or carrier, used in dyes, inks, and paints.
noun
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6
A scenic pond, as in a park.
noun
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A large inland body of standing fresh or salt water. Lakes generally form in depressions, such as those created by glacial or volcanic action; they may also form when a section of a river becomes dammed or when a channel is isolated by a change in a river's course.
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A large, landlocked stretch of water.
noun
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1
A large amount of liquid; as, a wine lake.
noun
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In dyeing and painting, an often fugitive crimson or vermillion pigment derived from an organic colorant (cochineal or madder, for example) and an inorganic, generally metallic mordant.
noun
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To make lake-red.
verb
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(obsolete) To play; to sport.
verb
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A deep red.
noun
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For the names of actual lakes, see the specific element of the name; for example, Erie, Lake; Lucerne, Lake of; Lomond, Loch. Other geographic names beginning with Lake are entered under Lake; for example, Lake Charles, Louisiana.
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An inland body of usually fresh water, larger than a pool or pond, generally formed by some obstruction in the course of flowing water.
noun
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A pool of oil or other liquid.
noun
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An insoluble coloring compound precipitated from a solution of a dye by adding a metallic salt, which acts as a mordant: used in applying dyes to cloth and in making paints, printing inks, etc.
noun
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(person) 1866-1945; U.S. engineer & naval architect.
proper name
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(now chiefly dialectal) A small stream of running water; a channel for water; a drain.
noun
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(dialectal) Play; sport; game; fun; glee.
noun
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1
(chiefly dialectal) To leap, jump, exert oneself, play.
verb
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(obsolete) Fine linen.
noun
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1

Origin of lake

  • Middle English from Old French lac and from Old English lacu both from Latin lacus

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From French laque lac1

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English lake (“lake, watercourse, body of water”), from Old English lacu (“lake, pond, pool, stream, watercourse”), from Proto-Germanic *lakō, *lōkiz (“stream, pool, water aggregation", originally "ditch, drainage, seep”), from Proto-Germanic *lekaną (“to leak, drain”), from Proto-Indo-European *leg-, *leǵ- (“to leak”). Cognate with Scots lake (“pond, pool, flowing water of a stream”), Dutch laak (“lake, pond, stream”), Middle Low German lāke (“standing water, water pooled in a riverbed”), German Lache (“pool, puddle”), Icelandic lækur (“stream, brook, flow”). See also leak, leach.

    From Wiktionary

  • Despite their similarity in form and meaning, English lake is not related to Latin lacus (“hollow, lake, pond”), Scottish Gaelic loch (“lake”), Ancient Greek λάκκος (lákkos, “waterhole, tank, pond, pit”), all from Proto-Indo-European *lakʷ- (“lake, pool”). Instead, this root is represented by Old English lagu (“sea, flood, water, ocean”), through Proto-Germanic *laguz, *lahō (“sea, water”), perhaps related to Albanian lag (“to water, make wet, moisturize”). See lay.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English lake, lak, lac (also loke, laik, layke), from Old English lāc (“play, sport, strife, battle, sacrifice, offering, gift, present, booty, message”), from Proto-Germanic *laiką (“play, fight”), *laikaz (“game, dance, hymn, sport”), from Proto-Indo-European *loig-, *leig- (“to bounce, shake, tremble”). Cognate with Old High German leih (“song, melody, music”) and Albanian luaj (“I move, play”). More at lay.

    From Wiktionary

  • From French laque (“lacquer”), from Persian لاک (lāk), from Hindi lakh, from Sanskrit laksha (“one hundred thousand”), referring to the number of insects that gather on the trees and make the resin seep out.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Old English lachen

    From Wiktionary

  • Compare lek.

    From Wiktionary