Harrow definition

hărō
To inflict great distress or torment on.
verb
12
1
To cause mental distress to; torment.
verb
7
2
To plunder or rob (Hell of redeemed souls). Used of Jesus after the Crucifixion.
verb
3
1
To drag a harrow over; to break up with a harrow.
verb
1
0

The headless horseman harrowed Ichabod Crane as he tried to reach the bridge.

verb
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To break or tear, as with a harrow; to wound; to lacerate; to torment or distress; to vex.
verb
1
0
(obsolete) A call for help, or of distress, alarm etc.
interjection
1
0
To break up and level (soil or land) with a harrow.
verb
2
2
A borough of Greater London in southeast England. It is the site of the public school Harrow, founded in 1572.
2
2
To take harrowing.

Ground that harrows well.

verb
1
1
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(archaic) To rob, plunder, or pillage.
verb
1
1
The definition of a harrow is a spiked frame that is carried by a horse or tractor to break up soil, cover seeds or pull up weeds.

An example of a harrow is a tool that farmers pull with a tractor to prepare soil for planting.

noun
0
0
Harrow is defined as to draw a tool over soil to break up dirt or weeds, or to bother, harass or stress.

An example of harrow is to flatten out soil for planting with a tool pulled behind a tractor.

An example of harrow is to mock and taunt someone every day.

verb
0
0
A device consisting of a heavy framework having several disks or teeth in a row, which is dragged across ploughed land to smooth or break up the soil, to remove weeds or cover seeds; a harrow plow.
noun
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0
(military) An obstacle formed by turning an ordinary harrow upside down, the frame being buried.
noun
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A frame with spikes or sharp-edged disks, drawn by a horse or tractor and used for breaking up and leveling plowed ground, covering seeds, rooting up weeds, etc.
noun
1
2
To draw a harrow over (land)
verb
1
2
(place) Borough of Greater London, England.
proper name
0
1
(place) Private preparatory school for boys, in this borough.
proper name
0
1
A farm implement consisting of a heavy frame with sharp teeth or upright disks, used to break up and even off plowed ground.
noun
1
3
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the harrowing of hell
  • Christ's redemption of the righteous souls in hell (or Limbo), just after the Crucifixion
idiom
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0

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
harrow
Plural:
harrows

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

the harrowing of hell

Origin of harrow

  • Middle English herwen variant of harien harry

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English harwe

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Either representing unattested Old English *hearwe or *hearġe (perhaps ultimately cognate with harvest), or from Old Norse harfr/herfi; compare Danish harve (“harrow”), Dutch hark (“rake”). Akin to Latin carpere.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Old French haro, harou, of uncertain origin.

    From Wiktionary