Grill meaning

grĭl
Grill is defined as to cook on a barbecue or griddle, or to ask a series of intense questions.

An example of to grill is to cook burgers on the barbecue.

An example of to grill is to ask a suspect questions until he finally breaks down and tells what happened.

verb
2
0
To broil on a gridiron.
verb
0
0
To torture or afflict as if by broiling.
verb
0
0
(informal) To question relentlessly; cross-examine.
verb
0
0
To mark or emboss with a gridiron.
verb
0
0
Advertisement
A cooking surface of parallel metal bars; a gridiron.
noun
0
0
Food cooked by broiling or grilling.
noun
0
0
An informal restaurant or a room in a restaurant where grilled foods are served.
noun
0
0
A series of marks grilled or embossed on a surface.
noun
0
0
A cooking unit having parallel metal bars or wires on which to broil meat or fish, as.
  • A portable or stationary outdoor device fueled by gas or charcoal.
  • An indoor unit, sometimes part of a range.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
A large griddle.
noun
0
0
Grilled food.
noun
0
0
A restaurant, club, or dining room that makes a specialty of grilled foods.
noun
0
0
To cook on a grill; broil.
verb
0
0
To torture by applying heat.
verb
0
0
Advertisement
To question relentlessly; cross-examine searchingly.
verb
0
0
To be subjected to grilling.
verb
0
0
noun
0
0
(Scotland, US) To make angry; provoke.
verb
0
0
(chiefly Scotland) To terrify; make tremble.
verb
0
0
Advertisement
(intransitive, chiefly Scotland) To tremble; shiver.
verb
0
0
(intransitive, Northern England, Scotland) To snarl; snap.
verb
0
0
adjective
0
0
noun
0
0
A rack; a grid of wire or a sheet of material with a pattern of holes or slots, usually used to protect something while allowing the passage of air and liquids. Typical uses: to allow air through a fan while preventing fingers or objects from passing; to allow people to talk to somebody, while preventing attack.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
On a vehicle, a slotted cover as above, to protect and hide the radiator, while admitting air to cool it.
noun
0
0
A device comprising a source of radiant heat and a means of holding food near it, to cook it; a barbecue; a griddle.

I put some peppers and mushrooms on the grill to go with dinner.

noun
0
0
(colloquial) A type of jewelry worn on the front teeth; by extension, the front teeth regarded collectively.
noun
0
0
Food cooked on a grill.

A packet of frozen cauliflower cheese grills.

noun
0
0
To cook food on a grill; to barbecue.

Why don't we get together Saturday and grill some burgers?

verb
0
0
Advertisement
(Australia, New Zealand, UK) To cook food under the element of a stove or only under the top element of an oven - (US) broil.
verb
0
0
(colloquial) To interrogate; to question aggressively or harshly.

The police grilled him about his movements at the time of the crime.

verb
0
0
The definition of a grill is a device for cooking that has lines of metal bars or a place where such food is cooked.

An example of a grill is a barbecue.

noun
0
1

Origin of grill

  • French griller from gril gridiron from Old French greille from Latin crātīcula griddle

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English grillen (“to anger, provoke”), from Old English grillan, griellan (“to annoy, vex, offend”), from Proto-Germanic *grellaną, *graljaną (“to shout, make angry”), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰer- (“to rattle, make a noise, grumble”). Cognate with Dutch grillen (“to shudder, shiver”), Low German vergrellen (“to anger, provoke”), German grollen (“to rumble”) and perhaps also with French grouiller (“to swarm”).

    From Wiktionary

  • 1655, from French gril, from Middle French, from Old French greïl, graïl (“gridiron”), from graïlle (“grate, grating”), from Latin crātīcula (“gridiron”), diminutive of crātis (“hurdle, wickerwork”), from Proto-Indo-European *kor(ə)t-, *krāt- (“to weave, twist, wattle; wicker”). Related to griddle, hurdle.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English gril, grille (“harsh, rough, severe”), from Old English *griell, from Proto-Germanic *grellaz (“angry”), from Proto-Indo-European *gher- (“to rattle, make a noise, grumble”). Cognate with German grell (“harsh, angry”), Danish grel (“shrill, glaring, dazzling”).

    From Wiktionary