Gape definitions

gāp, găp
To open the mouth wide.
verb
76
0
To stare wonderingly or stupidly, often with the mouth open.
verb
72
2
To be or become open or wide.

Holes gaped in the ceiling.

verb
69
2
The act or an instance of gaping.

A scoring move that elicited gapes from her teammates.

noun
66
2
A large opening.

A gape in the sail.

noun
63
2
A disease of birds, especially young domesticated chickens and turkeys, caused by gapeworms and resulting in obstructed breathing.
noun
60
3
The act of gaping.
  • An open-mouthed stare.
  • A yawn.
noun
58
2
A fit of yawning.
noun
56
2
A wide gap or opening.
noun
54
2
The measure of the widest possible opening of a mouth or beak.
noun
51
2
To open the mouth wide, as in yawning or from hunger.
verb
48
2
To stare with the mouth open, as in wonder or surprise.
verb
45
3
To open or be opened wide, as a chasm.
verb
42
2
The definition of a gape is a wide opening.

An example of a gape is a large hole in the fence.

noun
15
2
Gape is defined as to open the mouth widely, such as to yawn or in surprise.

An example of to gape is to gasp at a horrible sight.

verb
12
2
To open the mouth wide.
verb
5
2
(uncommon) An act of gaping; a yawn.

noun
5
2
(uncountable) A disease in poultry caused by gapeworm in the windpipe, a symptom of which is frequent gaping.
noun
5
2
noun
2
2
The width of an opening.
noun
2
2
The mouth, especially when open.
noun
0
1
The width of the space between the open jaws or mandibles of a vertebrate.
noun
0
1
(intransitive) To open the mouth wide, especially involuntarily, as in a yawn, anger, or surprise.
verb
0
2
(intransitive) To stare in wonder.
verb
0
2
(intransitive) To open wide; to display a gap.
verb
0
2
(zoology) The maximum opening of the mouth (of a bird, fish, etc.) when it is open.
noun
0
2

Origin of gape

From Middle English gapen, from Old Norse gapa (“to gape”) (compare Swedish gapa, Danish gabe), from Proto-Germanic *gapōną (descendants Middle English geapen, Dutch gapen, German gaffen), perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *ghēp-.