Dwarf definitions

dwôrf
Dwarf means to keep or make small, or to make something seem small by comparison.

An example of dwarf is pruning a tree so it doesn't grow any taller.

An example of dwarf is placing a tall person next to a shorter person to make the shorter person feel extremely short.

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The definition of dwarf is a person or thing that hasn't or won't reach typical size.

An example of dwarf is the planet Ceres.

adjective
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A dwarf is defined as a person or thing that is much smaller than typical.

An example of a dwarf is a sunflower that only grows to two feet tall.

noun
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A small creature resembling a human, often having magical powers, appearing in legends and fairy tales.
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A dwarf star.
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A person with a usually genetic disorder resulting in atypically short stature and often disproportionate limbs.
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An atypically small animal or plant.
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To check the natural growth or development of; stunt.
verb
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To cause to appear small by comparison.
verb
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To become stunted or grow smaller.
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Any human being, animal, or plant that is much smaller than the usual one of its species.
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A little being in human form, usually ugly or malformed, to whom magic powers are attributed.
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A star of relatively small size or mass and low luminosity.
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To keep from growing to full natural size.
verb
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To make small or insignificant.
verb
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To make seem small by comparison.
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To become stunted or dwarfed.
verb
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Much smaller than the usual one of its kind.
adjective
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Undersized; stunted.
adjective
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A person with a usually genetic disorder resulting in atypically short stature and often disproportionate limbs.
noun
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An atypically small animal or plant.
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An abnormally small person, often having limbs and features atypically proportioned or formed.
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An atypically small animal or plant.
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A dwarf star or dwarf galaxy.
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(mythology) Any member of a race of beings from (especially Scandinavian and other Germanic) folklore, usually depicted as having some sort of supernatural powers and being skilled in crafting and metalworking, often depicted as short, and sometimes depicted as clashing with elves.
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(now often offensive) A person of short stature, often one whose limbs are disproportionately small in relation to the body as compared with normal adults, usually as the result of a genetic condition.
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An animal, plant or other thing much smaller than the usual of its sort.

Dwarf tree; dwarf honeysuckle.

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(astronomy) A star of relatively small size.
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(especially in botany) Miniature.

The specimen is a very dwarf form of the plant.

It is possible to grow the plants as dwarf as one desires.

adjective
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To render (much) smaller, turn into a dwarf (version).
verb
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To make appear (much) smaller, puny, tiny.

The newly-built skyscraper dwarfs all older buildings in the downtown skyline.

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To make appear insignificant.

Bach dwarfs all other composers.

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(intransitive) To become (much) smaller.
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To hinder from growing to the natural size; to make or keep small; to stunt.

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Origin of dwarf

From Middle English dwerf, dwergh, dwerw, dwerȝ, from Old English dweorh, dweorg (“dwarf”), from Proto-Germanic *dwergaz, cognate with Old High German twerc (German Zwerg), Old Norse dvergr (Swedish dvärg), Old Frisian dwirg, Middle Low German dwerch, dwarch, twerg (Low German Dwarg, Dwarch), Middle Dutch dwerch, dworch (Dutch dwerg). The Germanic word is perhaps from a Proto-Indo-European *dʰwer- (“harm, deceive”); compare Sanskrit ध्वरति (dhvárati, “to bend, hurt”), ध्वरस् (dhvarás, “class of female demons”).