Giant meaning

jīənt
Frequency:
Giant is defined as of great size, strength or mind.

An example of something giant is an ice cream sundae with 10 scoops of ice cream and six toppings.

adjective
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1
The definition of a giant is a huge human being who fought with the gods in Greek mythology, or any great-sized or great-minded person.

An example of a giant is Goliath in the story of "David and Goliath."

noun
6
1
Marked by exceptionally great size, magnitude, or power.

A giant wave; a giant impact.

adjective
2
0
(gr. myth.) Any of a race of huge beings of human form who war with the gods.
noun
2
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Any imaginary being of human form but of superhuman size and strength.
noun
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A mythical human of very great size.
noun
2
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A person of extraordinary strength or powers, bodily or intellectual.
noun
2
0
A person or thing of great size, intellect, etc.
noun
1
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Like a giant; of great size, strength, etc.
adjective
1
0
(mythology) Specifically, any of the Gigantes, the race of giants in the Greek mythology.
noun
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A very tall person.
noun
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A tall species of a particular animal or plant.
noun
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(astronomy) A star that is considerably more luminous than a main sequence star of the same temperature (eg. red giant, blue giant).
noun
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(computing) An Ethernet packet that exceeds the medium's maximum packet size of 1,518 bytes.
noun
1
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A very large organisation.

The retail giant is set to acquire two more struggling high-street chains.

noun
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Very large.
adjective
1
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(baseball) A player on the team the San Francisco Giants.
noun
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(American football) A player on the team the New York Giants.
noun
1
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A gymnastic maneuver in which the body is swung, fully extended, around a horizontal bar.
noun
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Origin of giant

  • Middle English from Old French geant, jaiant from Vulgar Latin gagās gagant- from Latin gigās from Greek

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Ancient Greek γίγας (gigas, “giant”), Middle English geant, from Old French geant, gaiant (Modern French géant) from Vulgar Latin *gagās, gagant-, from Latin gigās, gigant-. Cognate to giga- (“1,000,000,000”).

    From Wiktionary

  • Replaced native Middle English eten, ettin (from Old English ēoten), Middle English eont (from Old English ent).

    From Wiktionary

  • Compare Modern English ent (“giant tree”) and Old English þyrs (“giant, monster, demon”).

    From Wiktionary