Butcher meaning

bo͝ochər
The definition of a butcher is someone who kills animals or cuts up the bodies of dead animals to be sold as meat.

An example of a butcher is someone who slaughters sheep.

noun
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To botch; bungle.

Butcher a project; butchered the language.

verb
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A person who cuts up meat for sale.
noun
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To kill or dress (animals) for meat.
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A person who prepares and sells meat (sometimes also slaughters the animals).
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To slaughter (animals) and prepare (meat) for market.
verb
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An occupational surname​ for a butcher.
pronoun
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Butcher is defined as to kill animals or prepare dead animals for meat or to kill large numbers of people without feeling.

An example of butcher is the killing of thousands of people in the Darfur genocide.

verb
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One that kills brutally or indiscriminately.
noun
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A vendor, especially one on a train or in a theater.
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One who bungles something.
noun
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To slaughter or prepare (animals) for market.
verb
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To kill brutally or indiscriminately.
verb
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A person whose work is killing animals or dressing their carcasses for meat.
noun
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Anyone who kills as if slaughtering animals.
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(informal, former) A person who sells candy, drinks, etc. in theaters, trains, circuses, etc.
noun
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To kill (people, game, etc.) brutally, senselessly, or in large numbers; slaughter.
verb
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To mess up; botch.
verb
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(by extension) A brutal or indiscriminate killer.
noun
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(Cockney rhyming slang, from butcher's hook) A look.
noun
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To kill brutally.
verb
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To ruin (something), often to the point of defamation.

The band at that bar really butchered "Hotel California".

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Origin of butcher

  • Middle English bucher from Old French bouchier from bouc, boc he-goat probably of Celtic origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English, from Anglo-Norman boucher, from Old French bouchier (“goat slaughterer”), from bouc (“goat”), of Germanic origin. More at buck.

    From Wiktionary