Bede meaning

bēdə
verb
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Anglo-Saxon theologian and historian whose major work, Ecclesiastical History of the English Nation (731), written in Latin, remains an important source of ancient English history. He introduced the method of dating events from the birth of Jesus.
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(a.d. 673-735); Eng. historian & theologian: his day is May 27
proper name
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noun
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verb
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(mining) A kind of pickaxe.
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Origin of bede

  • From Middle English bēden (“to pray, offer, proffer, request, demand, order, command, forbid; proclaim, declare; present, counsel, advise, exhort”), from Old English bēodian (“to command, decree, summon, banish, declare, inform, announce, proclaim; threaten, offer, proffer, give, grant, surrender”), from Proto-Germanic *beudaną, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰewdʰ-. Germanic cognates include Old Frisian biada, Old Saxon biodan (Low German beden), Dutch bieden, Old High German biotan (German bieten), Old Norse bjóða (Swedish bjuda (“command, show”)), Gothic * (biudan) (attested in compounds). The Indo-European root is also the source of Ancient Greek πευθεσθαι (peuthesthai, “ask for”), Sanskrit बोधयित (bodhayita, “wake”), Old Church Slavonic бъдети (bŭdeti) (Russian будить (budit’, “wake”)), Lithuanian budeti (“awake”). See also bid.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English bēde (“prayer, request, supplication, order, command, rosary, bead”), from Old English gebed (“prayer, petition, supplication, religious service, an ordinance”), from Proto-Germanic. Cognate with Dutch gebed and bede, German Gebet.

    From Wiktionary