Gristle meaning

grĭsəl
Cartilage, especially when present in meat.
noun
0
0
Cartilage, now esp. as found in meat.
noun
0
0
Cartilage; now especially: cartilage present, as a tough substance, in meat.
noun
0
0
1859, George Eliot, Adam Bede,

Look at Adam through the rest of the day, as he stands on the scaffolding with the two-feet ruler in his hand, whistling low while he considers how a difficulty about a floor-joist or a window-frame is to be overcome; or as he pushes one of the younger workmen aside and takes his place in upheaving a weight of timber, saying, "Let alone, lad! Thee'st got too much gristle i' thy bones yet"; or as he fixes his keen black eyes on the motions of a workman on the other side of the room and warns him that his distances are not right.

noun
0
0
1885, Ada Sarah Ballin, The Science of Dress in Theory and Practice,

It. must be borne in mind that the bones of a young infant are little more than gristle, and are liable to bend, and so become deformed.

noun
0
0
Advertisement
1896, Arthur Conan Doyle, Rodney Stone,

"The young 'un will make his way," said Belcher, who had come across to us. "He's more a sparrer than a fighter just at present, but when his gristle sets he'll take on anything on the list.

noun
0
0

Origin of gristle

  • Middle English from Old English

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English gristel, grystyl, from Old English gristel, gristle (“gristle, cartilage”), formed from a diminutive of Old English grist (“a grinding”), from Proto-Germanic *gredaną (“to crunch”), equivalent to grist +‎ -le. Cognate with Old Frisian gristel, gerstel (“gristle, cartilage”), Middle Low German gristel (“gristle”).

    From Wiktionary