Pray meaning

prā
To humbly beg a person for aid or their time.
verb
6
2
To utter or say a prayer or prayers to; address by prayer.
verb
4
2
To implore or beseech.

Pray tell me.

verb
3
4
To worship God, a god, etc., as by reciting certain set formulas silently or aloud.
verb
2
0
To ask very earnestly; make supplication, as to a deity.
verb
2
1
Advertisement
To petition or solicit help from a supernatural or higher being.

Muslims pray in the direction of Mecca.

verb
1
0
(religion) To communicate with God for any reason.
verb
1
0
Please; used to make a polite request.

Pray silence for...

adverb
1
0
Pray is defined as to ask for something or to offer thanks or praise to a god, goddess or other deity.

An example of to pray is asking God to bless a meal you're about to eat.

verb
1
1
To recite (a prayer) silently or aloud.
verb
1
1
Advertisement
To bring about, get, etc. by praying.
verb
1
1
To utter or address a prayer or prayers to a deity or an object of worship, often as an entreaty.

People praying in the pews of the church; people praying for divine guidance; people praying for their loved ones.

verb
0
1
To use prayer to request (that something may happen).

The congregation prayed that the drought would end soon. The child prayed to be more considerate of others.

verb
0
1
To say (a prayer or group of prayers).

Pray the rosary.

verb
0
1
To make a devout or earnest request for.

I pray your forgiveness.

verb
0
1
Advertisement
To ask (someone) imploringly for something; beseech. Used chiefly in the phrase I pray you to introduce a polite or urgent request or question.

I pray you be careful.

verb
0
1
Used to make a polite or urgent request or question.

Pray don't apologize.

adverb
0
1
To ask for by prayer or supplication; beg for imploringly.
verb
0
1

Origin of pray

  • Middle English preien from Old French preier from Latin precārī from precēs pl. of *prex prayer prek- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English preien, from Anglo-Norman preier, from Old French preier, proier, (French prier), from Late Latin precāre, from Latin precārÄ«, present active infinitive of precor, from prex, precis, “a prayer, a request"; akin to Sanskrit prach “to ask", Old English frignan, fricgan, German fragen, Dutch vragen. Confer deprecate, imprecate, precarious.
    From Wiktionary