Aperture definition

ăpər-chər
Frequency:
The opening, or the diameter of the opening, in a camera, telescope, etc. through which light passes into the lens.
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An opening, such as a hole, gap, or slit.
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The definition of an aperture is a crevice, hole, or separation.

An example of an aperture is the opening in a camera lense.

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An opening; hole; gap.
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A usually adjustable opening in an optical instrument, such as a camera or telescope, that limits the amount of light passing through a lens or onto a mirror.
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The diameter of such an opening, often expressed as an f-number.
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The diameter of the objective of a telescope.
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An opening; an open space; a gap, cleft, or chasm; a passage perforated; a hole; as, an aperture in a wall.

An aperture between the mountains. --Gilpin.

The back aperture of the nostrils. --Owen.

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(optics) Something which restricts the diameter of the light path through one plane in an optical system.
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(astronomy, photography) The diameter of the aperture (in the sense above) which restricts the width of the light path through the whole system. For a telescope, this is the diameter of the objective lens. e.g. a telescope may have a 100 cm aperture.
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(spaceflight, communication) The (typically) large-diameter antenna used for receiving and transmitting radio frequency energy containing the data used in communication satellites, especially in the geostationary belt. For a comsat, this is typically a large reflective dish antenna; sometimes called an array.
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(mathematics, rare, of a right circular cone) The maximum angle between the two generatrices.

If the generatrix makes an angle θ to the axis, then the aperture is 2θ.

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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
aperture
Plural:
apertures

Origin of aperture

  • Middle English from Latin apertūra from apertus past participle of aperīre to open wer-4 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Latin apertūra (“opening”), from apertus, past participle of aperīre (“to open, uncover”), opposed to operīre (“to close, cover”). See aperient.

    From Wiktionary