Pore meaning

pôr
A minute opening in tissue, as in the skin of an animal, serving as an outlet for perspiration, or in a plant leaf or stem, serving as a means of absorption and transpiration.
noun
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To read, study, or examine something carefully and attentively.

Pored over the documents in search of evidence.

verb
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A space in rock, soil, or unconsolidated sediment that is not occupied by mineral matter and that allows the passage or absorption of fluids.

Water seeped into the pores of the rock.

noun
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Pore is defined as to carefully read or study something.

An example of to pore is to very carefully read a book.

verb
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The definition of a pore is a tiny opening in an animal's skin that allows it to breath and sweat.

An example of a pore are the tiny holes on the nose.

noun
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A similar opening in rock or other substances.
noun
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A minute opening in tissue, as in the skin of an animal, serving as an outlet for perspiration, or in a plant leaf or stem, serving as a means of absorption and transpiration.
noun
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A tiny opening, as one in an animal's skin or on the surface of a plant leaf or stem, through which liquids or gases may pass.
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A space in soil, rock, or loose sediment that is not occupied by mineral matter and allows the passage or absorption of fluids, such as water, petroleum, or air.
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(now rare) To gaze intently.
verb
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To read or study carefully.

To pore over a book.

verb
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To think deeply and thoroughly; ponder.
verb
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(obs.) A passage; channel.
noun
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A tiny opening, usually microscopic, as in plant leaves or skin, through which fluids may be absorbed or discharged.
noun
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To meditate deeply; ponder.

Pored on the matter.

verb
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(archaic) To gaze intently; stare.
verb
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Origin of pore

  • Middle English from Old French from Late Latin porus passage from Greek poros per-2 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English pouren

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English pouren, from Old French, from Latin porus, from Ancient Greek πόρος (poros, “passage").

    From Wiktionary