Vesicle meaning

vĕs'ĭ-kəl
A small enclosed structure or cavity, especially:
  • A membrane-bound structure within a cell in which materials such as enzymes are transported or stored.
  • A sac or cyst, especially one containing fluid.
  • A blister of the skin.
  • A cavity formed in volcanic rock by entrapment of a gas bubble during solidification.
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A small, membranous cavity, sac, or cyst.
  • A small cavity or sac filled with fluid; esp., a small, round elevation of the skin containing a serous fluid; blister.
  • A small, bladderlike sac filled with air or liquid.
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A small, spherical cavity in volcanic rock, produced by bubbles of air or gas in the molten rock.
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A small sac or cyst, especially one containing liquid.
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A small circumscribed elevation of the skin containing serum.
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A membrane-bound structure within a cell in which materials such as enzymes are transported or stored.
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A small fluid-filled sac in the body.
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A membrane-bound sac in eukaryotic cells that stores or transports the products of metabolism in the cell and is sometimes the site for the breaking down of metabolic wastes. Vesicles bulge out and break off from the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi apparatus. Vesicles get their energy for mobility from ATP. Lysosomes and peroxisomes are vesicles.
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A small cavity formed in volcanic rock by entrapment of a gas bubble during solidification.
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(cytology) A membrane-bound compartment found in a cell.
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A small bladder-like cell or cavity.
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(anatomy) A small sac or cyst or vacuole, especially one containing fluid. A blister formed in or beneath the skin, containing serum. A bleb.
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(anatomy) A pocket of embryonic tissue that is the beginning of an organ.
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(geology) A small cavity formed in volcanic rock by entrapment of a gas bubble during solidification.
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Origin of vesicle

  • Middle English from Old French vesicule from Latin vēsīcula diminutive of vēsīca bladder, blister
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From French vésicule or its source, Latin vÄ“sÄ«cula.
    From Wiktionary