Cell meaning

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A cell is defined as the smallest unit of an organism with a nucleus.

An example of a cell is a unit in the tissue of an animal muscle.

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A small enclosed cavity or space, such as a compartment in a honeycomb or within a plant ovary or an area bordered by veins in an insect's wing.
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(biology) The smallest structural unit of an organism that is capable of independent functioning, consisting of cytoplasm, usually one nucleus, and various other organelles, all surrounded by a semipermeable cell membrane.
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A narrow confining room, as in a prison or convent.
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A storm cell.
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A small room or cubicle, as in a convent or prison.
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A very small hollow, cavity, or enclosed space.
  • Any of the compartments in a honeycomb.
  • A small, hollow space in tissue, esp. in bone.
  • The space of an insect's wings enclosed by the veins.
  • Any compartment of an ovary; also, a pollen sac or spore sac.
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Any of the smallest organizational units of a group or movement, as of a Communist party.
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A small religious house dependent on a larger one, such as a priory within an abbey.
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The smallest structural unit of an organism that is capable of independent functioning, consisting of cytoplasm, usually one nucleus, and various other organelles, all surrounded by a semipermeable cell membrane.
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A fuel cell.
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A small convent or monastery attached to a larger one.
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Any of the individual boxes in which words or numerical data may be entered in a table or spreadsheet: cells read across form rows, cells read up or down form columns.
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Any of the small areas making up a cellular communications system, each having a low-power transmitter and receiver combination.
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(biol.) A very small, complex unit of protoplasm, usually with a nucleus, cytoplasm, and an enclosing membrane: all plants and animals are made up of one or more cells that usually combine to form various tissues.
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adjective
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A small enclosed cavity or space.
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The smallest organizational unit of a clandestine group or movement, such as a banned political movement or a terrorist group. A cell's leader is often the only person who knows members of the organization outside the cell.
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A small humble abode, such as a hermit's cave or hut.
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The basic unit of living matter in all organisms, consisting of protoplasm enclosed within a cell membrane. All cells except bacterial cells have a distinct nucleus that contains the cell's DNA as well as other structures (called organelles) that include mitochondria, the endoplasmic reticulum, and vacuoles. The main source of energy for all of a cell's biological processes is ATP.
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In asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) and Switched Multimegabit Data Service (SMDS) networks, a small protocol data unit (PDU) comprising 53 octets.The ATM cell consists of a header of 5 octets and payload of 48 octets.The small cell size offers the advantage of effectively supporting any type of data, including voice, fax, text, image, video, and multimedia, whether compressed or uncompressed and whether real-time or non-real-time. The fixed cell size offers the advantage of predictability, unlike the variable-length frames associated with services such as X.25, frame relay, and Ethernet, or the variablelength packets associated with the Internet Protocol (IP).This level of predictability yields much improved access control and congestion control. See also ATM, compression, Ethernet, frame relay, header, IP, non-real-time, packet, payload, PDU, real-time, SMDS, and X.25.
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Any of various devices, or units within such devices, that are capable of converting some form of energy into electricity. Cells contain two electrodes and an electrolyte.
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In radio systems, a relatively small geographical area of coverage determined by factors such as frequency band, power level, and line of sight (LOS).The formal concept of radio cells dates back to 1947, when Bell Telephone engineers developed a radio system concept that included numerous, low-power transmit/receive antennas positioned throughout a metropolitan area. This sort of architecture served to increase the effective subscriber capacity of radio systems by breaking the area of coverage into cells, or smaller areas of coverage. Thereby, each frequency band could be reused in nonadjacent cells. Additionally, the cells can be split, or subdivided, further as the traffic demands of the system increase. In the context of radio telephony, including cellular telephony, cells can be characterized as falling into three broad descriptive categories, as illustrated in Figure C-2.
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(communication) A short, fixed-length packet as in asynchronous transfer mode. [from 20th c.]

Virtual Channel number 5 received 170 cells.

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(communication) A region of radio reception that is a part of a larger radio network.

I get good reception in my home because it is near a cell tower.

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(geometry) A three-dimensional facet of a polytope.
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(statistics) The unit in a statistical array (a spreadsheet, for example) where a row and a column intersect.
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(architecture) The space between the ribs of a vaulted roof.
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(architecture) A cella.
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To place or enclose in a cell.
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(US, informal) A cellular phone.
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The definition of a cell is a small area in a prison where criminals are kept behind bars.

An example of a cell is where a murderer is locked up.

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(computers) A basic unit of storage in a computer memory that can hold one unit of information, such as a character or word.
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A box or other unit on a spreadsheet or similar array at the intersection of a column and a row.
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To store in a honeycomb.
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To live in or share a prison cell.
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A hermit's hut.
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(1) A geographic area in a cellular phone system. See cellphone.
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A single-room dwelling for a hermit. [from 10th c.]
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(now historical) A small monastery or nunnery dependent on a larger religious establishment. [from 11th c.]
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A small room in a monastery or nunnery accommodating one person. [from 14th c.]

Gregor Mendel must have spent a good amount of time outside of his cell.

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Each of the small hexagonal compartments in a honeycomb. [from 14th c.]
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(biology, now chiefly botany) Any of various chambers in a tissue or organism having specific functions. [from 14th c.]
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A section or compartment of a larger structure. [from 16th c.]
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1810, Walter Scott, Lady of the Lake, II.

Not long shall honour'd Douglas dwell, / Like hunted stag, in mountain-cell [...].

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A room in a prison for one or more inmates. [from 18th c.]

The combatants spent the night in separate cells.

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A device which stores electrical power; used either singly or together in batteries; the basic unit of a battery. [from 19th c.]

This MP3 player runs on 2 AAA cells.

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(biology) The basic unit of a living organism, consisting of a quantity of protoplasm surrounded by a cell membrane, which is able to synthesize proteins and replicate itself. [from 19th c.]
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(meteorology) A small thunderstorm, caused by convection, that forms ahead of a storm front. [from 20th c.]

There is a powerful storm cell headed our way.

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(computing) The minimal unit of a cellular automaton that can change state and has an associated behavior. [from 20th c.]

The upper right cell always starts with the color green.

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(card games) In FreeCell-type games, a space where one card can be placed.
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A small group of people forming part of a larger organization, often an outlawed one. [from 20th c.]

Those three fellows are the local cell of that organization.

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Origin of cell

  • Middle English celle from Old English cell and from Old French both from Latin cella chamber kel-1 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Old English *cella (attested in inflected forms), from Latin cella (“chamber, small room, compartment”), later reinforced by Anglo-Norman cel, sele, Old French cele.

    From Wiktionary

  • From cell phone, from cellular phone, from cellular + telephone

    From Wiktionary