Cellar definition

sĕlər
Frequency:
An underground shelter, as from storms.
noun
9
3
A room or group of rooms below the ground level and usually under a building, often used for storing fuel, provisions, or wines.
noun
7
2
A wine cellar.
noun
7
3
To store in a cellar.
verb
6
2
(slang) The last place or lowest level, especially in competitive standings.

The team came from the cellar to win the pennant.

noun
5
2
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A stock of wines kept in such a cellar.
noun
4
3
A cellar is a basement space or a space below the main levels of a house, often used to stockpile of wine or other provisions.

Your basement floor below the first floor of your home is an example of a cellar.

Your collection of 200 bottles of wine is an example of a wine cellar.

noun
2
1
The definition of cellar is to store wine in a special room, usually below ground, that is an optimal temperature or provides optimal storage conditions.

When you put a new bottle of wine you have bought into a room where you already have 100 bottles of wine, this is an example of when you cellar the wine.

verb
2
1
To store in a cellar.
verb
3
3
An enclosed underground space, often under a building; used for storage or shelter.
noun
1
1
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A wine collection, especially when stored in a cellar.
noun
1
1
(slang) Last place in a competition.
noun
0
0
(historical) A small dish for holding salt.
noun
0
0
To store in a cellar.
verb
0
0
Salt cellar.
noun
0
0
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A room or enclosed space used for storage, usually beneath the ground or under a building.
noun
2
3
A basement.
noun
2
3
the cellar
  • the lowest position, as in the relative standing of competing teams
idiom
0
1

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
cellar
Plural:
cellars

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

the cellar

Origin of cellar

  • Middle English celer from Old French from Late Latin cellārium pantry from Latin cella storeroom kel-1 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From 15th Century English saler, from Old French salière, from Latin salarius (“relating to salt”), from Latin sal (“salt”)

    From Wiktionary

  • From Anglo-Norman celer, Old French celier (modern cellier), from Latin cellārium.

    From Wiktionary