Window meaning

wĭndō
Frequency:
A range of electromagnetic frequencies that pass unobstructed through a planetary atmosphere.
noun
9
3
Strips of foil dropped from an aircraft to confuse enemy radar; chaff.
noun
4
1
The transparent panel of a window envelope.
noun
3
0
The definition of a window is a pane of glass or plastic in a house, car or other structure, or something you look through, either literally or metaphorically, to see what is on the other side.

An example of a window is the glass on the front or back of your house that allows you to look out.

An example of a window is the eyes, which are said to be windows to the soul because looking into someone's eyes helps you to understand the person.

noun
2
0
(computers) A rectangular area on a screen in which a document, database, or application can be viewed independently of the other such areas.
noun
2
0
Advertisement
noun
2
0
Any portion of the frequency spectrum of the earth's atmosphere through which light, heat, or radio waves can penetrate to the earth's surface due to the low absorption or dissipation of electromagnetic energy in this particular portion.
noun
2
0
(comput.) A discrete, typically rectangular, display of data appearing on a computer screen: in many GUIs, several windows may appear side by side.
noun
2
0
To provide with a window or windows.
verb
2
0
An interval of time during which an activity can or must take place.

A window of opportunity for a space mission; a window of vulnerability when the air force was subject to attack.

noun
2
1
Advertisement
(1) A time period. For example, a "window of opportunity" implies a favorable time.
1
0
To place at or in a window.

Wouldst thou be windowed in great Rome and see / Thy master thus with pleach'd arms, bending down / His corrigible neck? "” Shakespeare.

verb
1
0
The area or space immediately behind a window, especially at the front of a shop.

Goods displayed in the window.

noun
1
1
A means of access or observation.

St. Petersburg was Peter the Great's window onto the Baltic.

noun
1
1
An opening or opportunity for passage of data frames or packets without the requirement for an acknowledgement from the receiving device. See modulo and TCP.
0
0
Advertisement
An opening or opportunity for passage of a range of wavelengths in a fiber optic transmission system (FOTS). For example, a laser diode might fire at 1550 nm, referring to a range of wavelengths with a nominal center point of 1550 nm. A light-emitting diode (LED) might fire at 850 nm, and a vertical cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) at 1300 nm or 1310 nm. The ITU-T has established a number of standard windows, as detailed in Table W-1. Generally speaking, the higher the transmission window (i.e., the longer the wavelength and lower the frequency), the less the signal attenuation, but the more expensive the associated electronics. See also attenuation, FOTS, frequency, laser diode, LED, VCSEL, and wavelength.
0
0
An opening, usually covered by one or more panes of clear glass, to allow light and air from outside to enter a building or vehicle.
noun
0
0
An opening, usually covered by glass, in a shop which allows people to view the shop and its products from outside.
noun
0
0
A period of time when something is available.

Launch window; window of opportunity.

I have a two-hour window when my wife's out of the house if you want to come round an fool about.

noun
0
0
(graphical user interface) A rectangular area on a computer terminal or screen containing some kind of user interface, displaying the output of and allowing input for one of a number of simultaneously running computer processes.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
To furnish with windows.
verb
0
0
out of the window
  • gone or dashed, esp. irretrievably so
idiom
1
0

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

out of the window

Origin of window

  • Middle English from Old Norse vindauga vindr air, wind wē- in Indo-European roots auga eye okw- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English windowe, windohe, windoge, from Old Norse vindauga (“window", literally “wind-eye", "wind-aperture", "wind-hole"), equivalent to wind +"Ž eye. Cognate with Scots wyndo, wyndok, winnock (“window"), Icelandic vindauga (“window"), Norwegian vindauga, vindu (“window"), Danish vindue (“window"), old German Windauge. The “windows" in these times were just unglazed holes (eyes) in the wall or roof that permitted wind to pass through.

    From Wiktionary