Abject meaning

ăbjĕkt, ăb-jĕkt
The definition of abject is something that is very bad or miserable.

An example of abject poverty would be homelessness.

adjective
7
3
Being of the most miserable kind; wretched.

Abject poverty; abject grief.

adjective
5
0
(obsolete) To cast off or out; to reject. [Attested from around (1350 to 1470) until the late 17th century.]
verb
4
2
A person in the lowest and most despicable condition; a castaway; outcast. [First attested from the late 15th century.]
noun
4
4
Cast down in spirit or hope; degraded; servile; grovelling; despicable; lacking courage; offered in a humble and often ingratiating spirit. [First attested from around (1350 to 1470).]
adjective
2
3
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Thoroughgoing; complete. Used to modify pejorative nouns.

An abject failure.

adjective
1
1
Showing utter hopelessness; helplessness; showing resignation; wretched. [First attested from around (1350 to 1470).]
adjective
1
2
Extremely contemptible or degrading.

Abject cowardice.

adjective
0
0
Extremely submissive or self-abasing.

Abject apologies.

adjective
0
1
Of the lowest degree; miserable; wretched.

Abject poverty.

adjective
0
1
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Lacking self-respect; degraded.

An abject coward.

adjective
0
1
Sunk to or existing in a low condition, state, or position. [First attested from around (1350 to 1470).]
adjective
0
1
(obsolete) To cast down; hence, to abase; to degrade; to lower; to debase. [Attested from around (1350 to 1470) until the late 17th century.]

verb
0
1

Origin of abject

  • Middle English outcast from Latin abiectus past participle of abicere to cast away ab- from ab–1 iacere to throw yē- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English abiect (“outcast, wretched”), from Latin abiectus, past participle of abiciō (“to throw away, cast off, to reject”), from ab (“away”) + iaciō (“to throw”).

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English abjecten, derived from the adjective form.

    From Wiktionary