Tuck Definition

tŭk
tucked, tucking, tucks
verb
tucked, tucking, tucks
To thrust the edges of (a sheet, napkin, shirt, etc.) under or in, in order to make secure.
Webster's New World
To sew a fold or folds in (a garment)
Webster's New World
To pull up or gather up in a fold or folds; draw together so as to make shorter.
To tuck up one's skirt for wading.
Webster's New World
To cover or wrap snugly in or as in this way, as with bedclothes.
To tuck a child in for the night.
Webster's New World
To draw together; pucker.
Webster's New World
Advertisement
noun
tucks
A sewed fold in a garment, for shortening or decoration.
Webster's New World
The act of tucking.
American Heritage
A flattened pleat or fold, especially a very narrow one stitched in place.
American Heritage
The part of a ship's hull under the stern where the ends of the bottom planks come together.
American Heritage
A position of the body, esp. in diving, in which the knees are drawn up tightly to the chest.
Webster's New World
Synonyms:
Advertisement
idiom
tuck away
  • to eat (something) heartily
  • to put aside or apart, as for future use
Webster's New World
tuck in
  • to pull in or contract (one's chin, stomach, etc.)
  • to eat (something) heartily
Webster's New World

Other Word Forms of Tuck

Noun

Singular:
tuck
Plural:
tucks

Idioms, Phrasal Verbs Related to Tuck

Origin of Tuck

  • From Middle English tuken, touken (“to torment, to stretch (cloth)"), from Old English tÅ«cian (“to torment, vex") and Middle Dutch tucken (“to tuck"), both from Proto-Germanic *teuh-, *teug- (“to draw, pull") (compare also *tukkōnÄ…), from Proto-Indo-European *dewk- (“to pull"). Akin to Old High German zucchen (“to snatch, tug"), zuchôn (“to jerk"), Old English tÄ“on (“to draw, pull, train"). More at touch.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English tukken to beat a drum from Old North French toquer to strike from Vulgar Latin toccāre

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English tukken possibly from Middle Low German or Middle Dutch tocken, tucken

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Perhaps from French dialectal étoc from Old French estoc of Germanic origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old French estoc (“rapier"), from Italian stocco (“a truncheon, a short sword")

    From Wiktionary

  • Old Provençal tuc (“uncooked").

    From Wiktionary

  • Origin unknown

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Compare tocsin.

    From Wiktionary

Advertisement

Find Similar Words

Find similar words to tuck using the buttons below.

Words Starting With

Words Ending With

Unscrambles

tuck
Advertisement