Tuck meaning

tŭk
The definition of a tuck is a fold in fabric or a surgical procedure in which excess fat is removed.

An example of a tuck is little folds in the bottom of drapes.

An example of a tuck is when a woman has a tummy tuck to remove fat from her belly.

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A flattened pleat or fold, especially a very narrow one stitched in place.
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The part of a ship's hull under the stern where the ends of the bottom planks come together.
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A cosmetic surgical procedure in which skin or fat is removed, sometimes accompanied by muscle tightening, to create a slimmer or more youthful appearance.
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Food, especially sweets and pastry.
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A beat or tap, especially on a drum.
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A slender sword; a rapier.
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Energy; vigor.
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To pull up or gather up in a fold or folds; draw together so as to make shorter.

To tuck up one's skirt for wading.

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To sew a fold or folds in (a garment)
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To put or press snugly into a small space; cram; fit.

To tuck shoes in a suitcase.

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To put (one's legs) in the position of a tuck.
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To make tucks.
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A sewed fold in a garment, for shortening or decoration.
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A position of the body, esp. in diving, in which the knees are drawn up tightly to the chest.
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Food; esp., sweets.
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Plastic surgery, esp. for cosmetic reasons, in which excess skin or fat is removed from the lower abdomen, from around the eyes, etc.
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A rapier.
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To beat or tap (a drum)
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A beat or tap, as on a drum.
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To pull or gather up (an item of fabric). [From 14thC.]
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To push into a snug position; to place somewhere safe or somewhat hidden. [From 1580s.]

Tuck in your shirt.

I tucked in the sheet.

He tucked the $10 bill into his shirt pocket.

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(intransitive, often with "in" or "into") To eat; to consume. [From 1780s.]
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(ergative) To fit neatly.

The sofa tucks nicely into that corner.

Kenwood House is tucked into a corner of Hampstead Heath.

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To curl into a ball; to fold up and hold one's legs.

The diver tucked, flipped, and opened up at the last moment.

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To sew folds; to make a tuck or tucks in.

To tuck a dress.

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To full, as cloth.
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(LGBT) To conceal one's genitals, especially by fastening them down with adhesive tape.

Honey, have you tucked today? We don't wanna see anything nasty down there.

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(when playing scales on piano keys) To keep the thumb in position while moving the rest of the hand over it to continue playing keys that are outside the thumb.
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An act of tucking; a pleat or fold. [From late 14thC.]
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(sewing) A fold in fabric that has been stitched in place from end to end, as to reduce the overall dimension of the fabric piece.
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A curled position.
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(medicine, surgery) A plastic surgery technique to remove excess skin.
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(music, piano, when playing scales on piano keys) The act of keeping the thumb in position while moving the rest of the hand over it to continue playing keys that are outside the thumb.
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(diving) A curled position, with the shins held towards the body.
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(archaic) A rapier, a sword.
  • Sir Walter Scott.
    He wore large hose, and a tuck, as it was then called, or rapier, of tremendous length.

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The beat of a drum.
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Food, especially snack food.
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To tuck is to put the edges of fabric inside or under something, to fold a part of something (such as your body) under something else or to put something away in a specific place.

An example of tuck is when you tuck your shirt in or put the bottom tails of your shirt into your paints so they can't be seen.

An example of tuck is when you tuck your child in or fold the covers up over your child in bed.

An example of tuck is when you tuck your legs under you or move them underneath your body.

An example of tuck is when you put your passport away in a special little compartment of your purse so you don't lose it.

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To make tucks.
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The act of tucking.
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To draw together; pucker.
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tuck away
  • To eat (something) heartily.
  • To put aside or apart, as for future use.
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tuck in
  • To pull in or contract (one's chin, stomach, etc.).
  • To eat (something) heartily.
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of tuck

  • From Middle English tukken to beat a drum from Old North French toquer to strike from Vulgar Latin toccāre

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English tukken possibly from Middle Low German or Middle Dutch tocken, tucken

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Perhaps from French dialectal étoc from Old French estoc of Germanic origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Origin unknown

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English tuken, touken (“to torment, to stretch (cloth)"), from Old English tÅ«cian (“to torment, vex") and Middle Dutch tucken (“to tuck"), both from Proto-Germanic *teuh-, *teug- (“to draw, pull") (compare also *tukkōnÄ…), from Proto-Indo-European *dewk- (“to pull"). Akin to Old High German zucchen (“to snatch, tug"), zuchôn (“to jerk"), Old English tÄ“on (“to draw, pull, train"). More at touch.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Old French estoc (“rapier"), from Italian stocco (“a truncheon, a short sword")

    From Wiktionary

  • Old Provençal tuc (“uncooked").

    From Wiktionary

  • Compare tocsin.

    From Wiktionary