Tuckahoe definition

tŭkə-hō
Any edible root of a plant used by Native Americans of colonial-era Virginia.
  • The wild potato, the arrow arum, Peltandra virginica.
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1963, Thomas Jefferson Wertenbaker, The Old South: the founding of American civilization, page 213.

The poor Tuckahoe, however, when he purchased land in Washington County, or the Shenandoah, or in Rowan, seems to have left behind him, not only his worn-out fields and his tumbledown house, but his wasteful methods.

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The sclerotium of the wood-decay fungus Wolfiporia extensa, used by Native Americans and the Chinese as food and as a herbal medicine.
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Any of various plants or plant parts used by certain Native American peoples as food, especially the edible root of certain arums or the sclerotium of certain fungi.
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(historical) Any of various roots and tubers, as of arum species, used as food by Algonquian peoples of Virginia.
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A brown, massive, underground, basidiomycetous fungus (Poria cocos) producing an edible, carbohydrate substance.
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
tuckahoe
Plural:
tuckahoes

Origin of tuckahoe

  • Of Virginia Algonquian origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Powhatan tockawhoughe. The "person" sense implies that such a person was so poor as to be reduced to eating the root.

    From Wiktionary