Tack meaning

tăk
Frequency:
Stickiness, as that of a newly painted surface.
noun
3
2
Food, especially coarse or inferior foodstuffs.
noun
2
1
A short, light nail with a sharp point and a flat head.
noun
1
0
(nautical) To bring (a vessel) into the wind in order to change course or direction.
verb
1
0
To change one's course of action.
verb
1
0
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The harness for a horse, including the bridle and saddle.
noun
1
0
A short nail or pin, with a narrow shaft that is not tapered and a relatively large, flat head.
noun
1
0
A zigzag course, or movement in such a course.
noun
1
0
A course of action or policy, esp. one differing from another or a preceding course.
noun
1
0
To go in a zigzag course.
verb
1
0
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To change suddenly one's policy or course of action.
verb
1
0
An approach to accomplishing a goal or a method of dealing with a problem.
noun
1
1
Tack is defined as to fasten or secure something.

An example of to tack is to hang a picture on the wall.

verb
0
0
The definition of a tack is a sharp pointed nail with a flat head.

An example of tack is what is used to hang things on a bulletin board.

noun
0
0
A large, loose stitch made as a temporary binding or as a marker.
noun
0
0
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To fasten or attach with a tack or tacks.

Tacked the carpet down.

verb
0
0
To fasten or mark (cloth or a seam, for example) with a loose basting stitch.
verb
0
0
To put together loosely and arbitrarily.

Tacked some stories together in an attempt to write a novel.

verb
0
0
To add as an extra item; append.

Tacked two dollars onto the bill.

verb
0
0
Food; foodstuff.

Hardtack.

noun
0
0
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Equipment for riding a horse, as saddles, bridles, etc.; saddlery.
noun
0
0
To fasten or attach with tacks.
verb
0
0
To attach temporarily, as by sewing with long stitches.
verb
0
0
To attach as a supplement; add.

To tack an amendment onto a bill.

verb
0
0
(horsemanship) To put a saddle, bridle, etc. on (a horse)
verb
0
0
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A small nail with a flat head.
noun
0
0
noun
0
0
(sewing) A loose seam used to temporarily fasten pieces of cloth.
noun
0
0
(nautical) The lower corner on the leading edge of a sail relative to the direction of the wind.
noun
0
0
(nautical) A course or heading that enables a sailing vessel to head upwind. See also reach, gybe.
noun
0
0
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A direction or course of action, especially a new one.
noun
0
0
(nautical) The maneuver by which a sailing vessel turns its bow through the wind so that the wind changes from one side to the other.
noun
0
0
(nautical) The distance a sailing vessel runs between these maneuvers when working to windward; a board.
noun
0
0
(nautical) A rope used to hold in place the foremost lower corners of the courses when the vessel is close-hauled; also, a rope employed to pull the lower corner of a studding sail to the boom.
noun
0
0
Any of the various equipment and accessories worn by horses in the course of their use as domesticated animals. Saddles, stirrups, bridles, halters, reins, bits, harnesses, martingales, and breastplates are all forms of horse tack.
noun
0
0
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(chemistry) The stickiness of a compound, related to its cohesive and adhesive properties.
noun
0
0
noun
0
0
That which is attached; a supplement; an appendix.

noun
0
0
(law, Scotland) A contract by which the use of a thing is set, or let, for hire; a lease.

noun
0
0
To nail with a tack (small nail with a flat head).
verb
0
0
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To sew/stich with a tack (loose seam used to temporarily fasten pieces of cloth).
verb
0
0
(nautical) To maneuver a sailing vessel so that its bow turns through the wind, i.e. the wind changes from one side of the vessel to the other.
verb
0
0
To add something as an extra item.

To tack (something) onto (something)

verb
0
0
Often paired with "up", to place the tack on a horse.
verb
0
0
A stain; a tache.
noun
0
0
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Alternative Forms

Alternative Form of tack - 'bout ship

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
tack
Plural:
tacks

Origin of tack

  • Middle English tak fastener from Old North French taque probably of Germanic origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Short for tackle

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Origin unknown

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From an old or dialectal form of French tache. See techy.

    From Wiktionary