Swan meaning

swŏn
Any of various large waterbirds of the genera Cygnus and Coscoroba of the family Anatidae, having webbed feet, a long slender neck, and usually white plumage.
noun
0
0
To travel around from place to place.
verb
0
0
To declare; swear. Used in the phrase I swan as an interjection.
verb
0
0
Any of several large-bodied, web-footed waterfowl (family Anatidae, esp. genus Cygnus) with a long, graceful neck and, typically, pure white feathers: swans are graceful swimmers and strong flyers.
noun
0
0
A person who resembles or is thought to resemble a swan in some way; sometimes, specif., a great poet or singer.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
To move slowly or majestically, with a calm, serene air.
verb
0
0
To swear.
verb
0
0
Any of various species of large, long-necked waterfowl, of genus Cygnus, most of which have white plumage.
noun
0
0
(figuratively) One whose grace etc. suggests a swan.
noun
0
0
(UK, intransitive) To travel or move about in an aimless, idle, or pretentiously casual way.
verb
0
0
Advertisement
(US, slang) To declare (chiefly in first-person present constructions).
verb
0
0
anagrams
0
0
anagrams
0
0
anagrams
0
0
anagrams
0
0
Advertisement
(soccer) Someone connected with Swansea City Football Club, as a fan, player, coach, etc.
noun
0
0
(Australian rules football) Someone connected with the Sydney Swans, as a fan, player, coach, etc.
noun
0
0
pronoun
0
0
the Swan
  • The constellation Cygnus.
idiom
0
0

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

the Swan

Origin of swan

  • Probably alteration of dialectal (I) s' warrant (I) shall warrant
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Middle English from Old English swen- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Old English swan, from Proto-Germanic *swanaz. Cognate with West Frisian swan, Low German Swaan, swan, Dutch zwaan, German Schwan, Swedish svan, probably literally "the singing bird," from a Proto-Indo-European base *swon-/*swen- "to sing, make sound". Related to Old English geswin (“melody, song") and swinsian (“to make melody").
    From Wiktionary
  • Probably from dialectal I s'wan, contraction of "I shall warrant"; later seen as a minced form of I swear.
    From Wiktionary