Snipe meaning

snīp
(naval slang) A member of the engineering department on a ship.
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A strip of copy announcing some late breaking news or item of interest, typically placed in a print advertisement in such a way that it stands out from the ad.
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Any of various long-billed shorebirds of the family Scolopacidae, especially the widely distributed species Gallinago gallinago.
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A shot, especially a gunshot, from a concealed place.
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Any of various shorebirds (family Scolopacidae) with a long, slender, flexible bill used in probing for food, esp. a genus (Gallinago) living chiefly in marshy places.
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A shot from a hidden position.
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(slang) The butt of a cigar or cigarette.
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To hunt or shoot snipe.
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To shoot from a hidden position, as at individuals of an enemy force.
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To direct an attack (at someone) in a sly or underhanded way.
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Any of various limicoline game birds of the genera Gallinago, Lymnocryptes and Coenocorypha in the family Scolopacidae, having a long, slender, nearly straight beak.
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A shot fired from a concealed place.
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(slang) A cigarette butt.
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A bottle of wine measuring 0.1875 liters, one fourth the volume of a standard bottle; a quarter bottle or piccolo.
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An animated promotional logo during a television show.
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To shoot at individuals from a concealed place.
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(by extension) To shoot with a sniper rifle.
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To make malicious, underhand remarks or attacks.
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To watch a timed online auction and place a winning bid at the last possible moment.
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To shoot at individuals from a concealed place.
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To shoot snipe.
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To make malicious, underhand remarks or attacks.
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Origin of snipe

  • Middle English probably from Old Norse -snīpa (as in mȳrisnīpa marsh snipe)

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • The verb originated in the 1770s among soldiers in British India where a hunter skilled enough to kill the elusive snipe was dubbed a "sniper". The term sniper was first attested in 1824 in the sense of the word "sharpshooter".

    From Wiktionary

  • Middle English "type of bird", from Old Norse -snipa, in myrisnipa (“moor snipe")

    From Wiktionary