Puck meaning

pŭk
A hard rubber disk used in ice hockey.
noun
0
0
A mischievous sprite in English folklore.
noun
0
0
The hard rubber disk used in ice hockey.
noun
0
0
A mischievous sprite or elf.
noun
0
0
Robin Goodfellow: Puck appears as a character in Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
A mouse-like object used to draw on a digitizer tablet. A puck is more precise than a mouse. See digitizer tablet and mouse.
0
0
(ice hockey) A hard hard rubber disc; any other flat disc meant to be hit across a flat surface in a game.
noun
0
0
(chiefly Canada) An object shaped like a puck.
noun
0
0
(computing) A pointing device with a crosshair.
noun
0
0
A mischievous spirit.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
(mythology) A mischievous sprite in Celtic mythology and English folklore.
pronoun
0
0
(astronomy) One of the satellites of the planet Uranus.
pronoun
0
0

Origin of puck

  • Middle English pouke goblin from Old English pūca Sense 2, after the sprite in A Midsummer Night's Dream by Shakespeare
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Perhaps from dialectal puck to strike
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From puck (“mischievous spirit"), from Middle English puke, from Old English pÅ«ca (“goblin, demon"), from Proto-Germanic *pÅ«kô (“a goblin, spook"), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)pāug(')- (“brilliance, spectre"). Cognate with Old Norse pÅ«ki (dialectal Swedish puke, “devil"), Middle Low German spōk, spÅ«k (“apparition, ghost"), German Spuk (“a haunting"). More at spook.
    From Wiktionary
  • From Middle English puke, from Old English pÅ«ca (“goblin, demon"), from Proto-Germanic *pÅ«kô (“a goblin, spook"), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)pāug(')- (“brilliance, spectre"). Cognate with Old Norse pÅ«ki (dialectal Swedish puke, “devil"), Middle Low German spōk, spÅ«k (“apparition, ghost"), German Spuk (“a haunting"). More at spook.
    From Wiktionary
  • Attested since 1886. From or influenced by Irish poc (“stroke in hurling, bag"). Compare poke (1861).
    From Wiktionary