Pounce meaning

pouns
Pounce is to jump on something, to take quick and decisive action or to swoop in and catch or attack something.

When a cat suddenly jumps on a mouse, this is an example of when the cat pounces on the mouse.

When a politician you do not like comes to your school to talk and you immediately jump all over him with aggressive questions, this is an example of when you pounce.

When you are given the chance to invest in a hot new company and you jump on that chance right away, this is an example of when you pounce.

verb
4
1
To transfer (a stenciled design) with pounce.
verb
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0
To spring or swoop with intent to seize someone or something.

A cat that pounced on a mouse; watched the falcon pounce on the baby rabbit.

verb
2
0
To attack or criticize suddenly.

Troops that pounced on a convoy; a reporter who pounced on a politician's change of position.

verb
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0
To turn the attention to and try to take advantage of.

Pounce on an opportunity; pounced on his mistake.

verb
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0
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A fine powder formerly used to smooth and finish writing paper and soak up ink.
noun
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0
A fine powder, such as pulverized charcoal, dusted over a stencil to transfer a design to an underlying surface.
noun
1
0
To sprinkle, smooth, or treat with pounce.
verb
1
0
To ornament (metal, for example) by perforating from the back with a pointed implement.
verb
1
0
To swoop down, spring, or leap (on, upon, or at a person or thing) in, or as in, attacking or seizing.
verb
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A fine powder, as pulverized cuttlefish bone, formerly used to prevent ink from blotting or to prepare the writing surface of parchment.
noun
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The act or an instance of pouncing.
noun
1
1
A claw or talon of a bird of prey.
noun
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The act of pouncing; swoop, spring, or leap.
noun
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0
A fine powder sprinkled over a stencil to make a design, as on cloth.
noun
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To sprinkle, rub, finish, or prepare with pounce.
verb
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To stencil with pounce.
verb
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(historical) A type of fine powder, as of sandarac, or cuttlefish bone, sprinkled over wet ink to dry the ink after writing.
noun
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(historical) Charcoal dust, or some other coloured powder for making patterns through perforated designs, used by embroiderers, lace makers, etc.
noun
0
0
To sprinkle or rub with pounce powder.

To pounce paper, or a pattern.

verb
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The claw or talon of a bird of prey.

noun
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A punch or stamp.
noun
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Cloth worked in eyelet holes.

noun
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(intransitive) To leap into the air intending to seize someone or something.

The kitten pounced at the ball I threw to him.

She pounced on the young man, because she loved him and wanted him for herself.

verb
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(intransitive) To attack suddenly by leaping.

I was awakened from a dead sleep by my child pouncing on top of me from out of nowhere.

verb
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(intransitive) To eagerly seize an opportunity.

I pounced on the chance to get promoted.

verb
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To strike or seize with the talons; to pierce, as with the talons.
verb
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To stamp holes in; to perforate.
verb
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0

Origin of pounce

  • From Middle English pointed tool, talon of a hawk shortening of ponson pointed tool variant of punchon pointed tool puncheon1

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English pouncen probably from Old French poinssonner from poinson pointed tool puncheon1

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • French ponce from Old French from Vulgar Latin pōmex *pōmic- from Latin pūmex pumice

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English, probably akin to punch. Possibly from Old French poinçonner; cf. poinçon.

    From Wiktionary

  • From French ponce, from Latin pumex.

    From Wiktionary