Liquor definition

lĭkər
Frequency:
Any liquid or juice.

Meat liquor.

noun
6
0
An alcoholic drink, esp. one made by distillation, as whiskey or rum.
noun
4
0
(pharmacy) A solution of some substance in water.
noun
3
0
(informal) To drink or cause to drink alcoholic liquor, esp. to the point of intoxication.
verb
3
0
A liquid obtained by cooking meat or vegetables (both).
noun
0
0
Advertisement
(chiefly US) Strong alcoholic drink derived from fermentation and distillation.
noun
0
0
In process industry, a liquid in which a desired reaction takes place, e.g. pulping liquor is a mixture of chemicals and water which breaks wood into its components, thus facilitating the extraction of cellulose.
noun
0
0
(intransitive) To drink liquor, usually to excess.
verb
0
0
To cause someone to drink liquor, usually to excess.
verb
0
0
Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster's Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
verb
0
0
Advertisement
An aqueous solution of a nonvolatile substance.
noun
0
1
A solution, emulsion, or suspension for industrial use.
noun
0
1
To steep (malt, for example).
verb
0
1
(slang) To make drunk with alcoholic liquor. Often used with up:

Was all liquored up.

verb
0
1
An alcoholic beverage made by distillation rather than by fermentation.
noun
0
2
Advertisement
A rich broth resulting from the prolonged cooking of meat or vegetables, especially greens.
noun
0
2

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
liquor
Plural:
liquors

Origin of liquor

  • Middle English licour a liquid from Old French from Latin liquor from liquēre to be liquid

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English, from licor, from Anglo-Norman licour, from Latin liquor (“fluidity, liquidness, a fluid, a liquid"), from liquere (“to be fluid or liquid"); see liquid.

    From Wiktionary