Lazy meaning

lā'zē
Unwilling to do work or make an effort.

Get out of bed, you lazy lout!

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Requiring little or no effort.
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I love staying inside and reading on a lazy Sunday.

We strolled along beside a lazy stream.

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(optometry) Of an eye, squinting because of a weakness of the eye muscles.
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(cattle branding) Turned so that the letter is horizontal instead of vertical.
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(computing theory) Employing lazy evaluation; not calculating results until they are immediately required.

A lazy algorithm.

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The definition of lazy is slow or sluggish behavior.

An example of lazy is an athlete who is not training well.

An example of lazy is an afternoon where there is not much action going on.

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Lazy is defined as feeling like resting instead of working or moving around.

An example of lazy is a cat in the sun.

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Not willing to work or be energetic.
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Slow-moving; sluggish.

A lazy river.

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Conducive to inactivity or indolence.

A lazy summer day.

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Depicted as reclining or lying on its side. Used of a brand on livestock.
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Not eager or willing to work or exert oneself; indolent; slothful.
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Slow and heavy; sluggish.

A lazy river.

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Characterized by idleness, relaxation, etc.

A lazy day.

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Designating or of a letter or figure placed on its side in a livestock brand.
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Origin of lazy

  • Probably of Low German origin
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • 1540, origin uncertain, but probably from Middle Low German lasich (“slack, feeble, lazy"), from las, from Proto-Germanic *lasiwaz, *laskaz (“feeble, weak"), from Proto-Indo-European *las- (“weak"). Akin to Dutch leuzig "lazy", Old Norse lasinn "limpy, tired, weak", Old English lesu, lysu "false, evil, base". More at lush.
    From Wiktionary
  • Alternate etymology traces lazy to Early Modern English laysy, a derivative of lay (plural lays + -y) in the same way that tipsy is derived from tip. See lay.
    From Wiktionary