Jig definitions

jĭg
The definition of a jig is a fishing bait with one or two hooks and a jerking motion that sinks to the bottom of the water.

An example of a jig is what someone fishing off the side of a pier would use as bait.

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Jig means to dance quickly by moving up and down.

An example of jig is the movement of Irish folk dancers.

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The definition of a jig is an energetic folk dance, or a template used with a saw for woodworking.

An example of a jig is Irish set dancing.

An example of a jig is a pattern for a curve which is used to create multiple curved shelves.

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A joke or trick. Used chiefly in the phrase The jig is up.
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A typically metal fishing lure with one or more hooks, usually deployed with a jiggling motion on or near the bottom.
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An apparatus for cleaning or separating crushed ore by agitation in water.
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A device for guiding a tool or for holding machine work in place.
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Any of various lively dances in triple time.
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The music for such a dance.
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To dance or play a jig.
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To move or bob up and down jerkily and rapidly.
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To operate a jig.
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To bob or jerk (something) up and down or to and fro.
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To machine (an object) with the aid of a jig.
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To separate or clean (ore) by shaking a jig.
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Used as a disparaging term for a black person.
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Any of various fishing lures that are jiggled up and down in the water.
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Any of several mechanical devices operated in a jerky manner, as a sieve for separating ores, a pounding machine, or a drill.
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A device, often with metal surfaces, used as a guide for a tool or as a template.
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A fast, springy sort of dance, usually in triple time.
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The music for such a dance.
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To dance or perform (a jig) or to dance in jig style.
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To move jerkily and quickly up and down or to and fro.
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To use a jig (on) in working.
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To fish or catch (a fish) with a jig.
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(music) A light, brisk musical movement; a gigue.
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(traditional Irish music and dance) A lively dance in 6/8 (double jig), 9/8 (slip jig) or 12/8 (single jig) time; a tune suitable for such a dance. By extension, a lively traditional tune in any of these time signatures. Unqualified, the term is usually taken to refer to a double (6/8) jig.

They danced a jig.

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(traditional English Morris dancing) A dance performed by one or sometimes two individual dancers, as opposed to a dance performed by a set or team.
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(fishing) A type of lure consisting of a hook molded into a weight, usually with a bright or colorful body.
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A device in manufacturing, woodworking, or other creative endeavors for controlling the location, path of movement, or both of either a workpiece or the tool that is operating upon it. Subsets of this general class include machining jigs, woodworking jigs, welders' jigs, jewelers' jigs, and many others.

Cutting circles out of pinewood is best done with a compass-style jig.

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(mining) An apparatus or machine for jigging ore.
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To move briskly, especially as a dance.

The guests were jigging around on the dancefloor.

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(fishing) To fish with a jig.
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To sing to the tune of a jig.
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To trick or cheat; to cajole; to delude.

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(mining) To sort or separate, as ore in a jigger or sieve.
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To cut or form, as a piece of metal, in a jigging machine.
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Origin of jig

An assimilated form of earlier gig, from Middle English gigge, from Old French gige, gigue (“a fiddle, kind of dance”), from Frankish *gīge (“dance, fiddle”), from Proto-Germanic *gīganą (“to move, wish, desire”), from Proto-Indo-European *gheiǵh-, *gheigh- (“to yawn, gape, long for, desire”). Cognate with Middle Dutch ghighe (“fiddle”), German Geige (“fiddle, violin”), Danish gige (“fiddle”), Icelandic gigja (“fiddle”). More at gig, geg.