Gig meaning

gĭg
A light, two-wheeled carriage drawn by one horse.
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A gigabyte.
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The definition of a gig is a job, especially performing jazz or rock music.

An example of gig is a jazz quartet performing at a dinner party.

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A demerit given in the military.
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A job, especially a booking for musicians.
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To ride in a gig.
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To fish for or catch with a gig.
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To give a military demerit to.
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An official record or report of a minor delinquency, as in a military school; demerit.
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Punishment for such a delinquency.
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To give a gig to.
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(1) (GIGabyte, GIGabit, GIGahertz, etc.). Common slang for some "giga" (billion) measurement. The terms "gigabits" and "gigabytes" are often erroneously interchanged. For details about correct usage, see space/time. See giga, meg, never say and gig economy.
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(informal, by extension) Any job; especially one that is temporary; or alternately, one that is very desirable.

I had this gig as a file clerk but it wasn't my style so I left.

Hey, that guy's got a great gig over at the bike shop. He hardly works all day!

noun
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(US, military) A demerit received for some infraction of military dress or deportment codes.

I received gigs for having buttons undone.

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(US, military) To impose a demerit for an infraction of a dress or deportment code.

His sergeant gigged him for an unmade bunk.

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An arrangement of barbless hooks that is dragged through a school of fish to hook them in their bodies.
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To catch a fish or frog with a gig.
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To work as a musician.
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A light, two-wheeled, open carriage drawn by one horse.
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A long, light ship's boat, esp. one reserved for the commanding officer.
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A machine for raising nap on cloth.
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To travel in a gig.
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A fish spear.
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A fish line with hooks designed to catch fish by jabbing into their bodies.
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To spear or jab with or as with a gig.
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A job performing music, esp. jazz or rock.
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Any job.
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To have a job performing music, esp. jazz or rock.
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(South England) A six-oared sea rowing boat commonly found in Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly.
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To fish or catch with a gig, or fish spear.
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To make fun of; to make a joke at someone's expense, often condescending.

His older cousin was just gigging him about being in love with that girl from school.

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(colloquial, computing) A gigabyte.

This picture is almost a gig; don't you wanna resize it?

How much music does it hold? A hundred and twenty gigs.

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A playful or wanton girl; a giglot.
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A pronged spear for fishing or catching frogs.
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(informal, music) A performing engagement by a musical group; or, generally, any job or role for a musician or performer.

I caught one of the Rolling Stones' first gigs in Richmond.

Hey, when are we gonna get that hotel gig again?

Our guitar player had another gig so we had to get a sub.

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(now historical) A two-wheeled horse-drawn carriage.
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(archaic) A forked spear for catching fish, frogs, or other small animals.
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To engage in musical performances.

The Stones were gigging around Richmond at the time.

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Origin of gig

  • Perhaps from obsolete gig spinning top from Middle English gyg- possibly of Scandinavian origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Short for fishgig

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Origin unknown

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Origin unknown

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Akin to Old Norse gigia (“fiddle”) and German Geige (“violin”).

    From Wiktionary

  • Probably from Latin gignere (“to beget”).

    From Wiktionary

  • A shortening of gigabyte.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Wiktionary