Hog Definition

hôg, hŏg
hogged, hogging, hogs
noun
hogs
Any swine, esp. a domesticated adult (Sus scrofa) ready for market, or, in England, a castrated boar.
Webster's New World
A domesticated pig weighing over 54 kilograms (120 pounds).
American Heritage Medicine
A selfish, greedy, or gluttonous person.
Webster's New World
A young sheep not yet shorn.
Webster's New World
A coarse or filthy person.
Webster's New World
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verb
hogged, hogging, hogs
To be higher in the center than at the ends.
Webster's New World
To arch (the back) like a hog's.
Webster's New World
To grab greedily; take all of or an unfairly large share of.
Webster's New World
To trim (a horse's mane) in order to make it bristly.
Webster's New World
To cause (a ship, keel, etc.) to be higher in the center than at the ends.
Webster's New World
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idiom
high on
  • In a lavish or extravagant manner:

    lived high on the hog after getting his inheritance.

American Heritage
go the whole hog
  • to go all the way; do or accept something fully
Webster's New World
high on (<i>or</i> off) the hog
  • in a luxurious or costly way
Webster's New World

Other Word Forms of Hog

Noun

Singular:
hog
Plural:
hogs

Idioms, Phrasal Verbs Related to Hog

Origin of Hog

  • From Middle English, from Old English hogg, hocg (“hog”), possibly from Old Norse hǫggva (“to strike, chop, cut”), from Proto-Germanic *hawwaną (“to hew, forge”), from Proto-Indo-European *kowə- (“to beat, hew, forge”). Cognate with Old High German houwan, Old Saxon hauwan, Old English hēawan (English hew). "Hog" originally meant a castrated male pig. (Compare "hoggett" for a castrated male sheep.) More at hew.

    From Wiktionary

  • Middle English from Old English hogg possibly of Celtic origin sū- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

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