Forest meaning

fôrĭst, fŏr-
A forest is defined as a large area that has many trees and other plants, or a dense area that is like a forest.

An example of a forest is Sherwood Forest from the Robin Hood stories.

An example of a forest is a grouping of tall buildings, a forest of tall buildings.

noun
27
11
To forest means to plant an area with trees.

An example of to forest is to plant trees in an area where many trees were lost in a fire.

verb
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A growth of trees and other plants covering a large area.
noun
14
10
To plant trees on or cover with trees.
verb
10
4
A thick growth of trees and underbrush covering an extensive tract of land; large woods.
noun
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4
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Of or in a forest; sylvan.
adjective
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The definition of forest is something that is green like an area covered with trees.

An example of forest is the color, forest green.

adjective
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A large number of objects bearing a similarity to such a growth, especially a dense collection of tall objects.

A forest of skyscrapers.

noun
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A defined area of land formerly set aside in England as a royal hunting ground.
noun
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3
(historical, brit.) Any of certain tracts of woodland or wasteland, usually the property of the sovereign, preserved for game.
noun
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3
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(graph theory) A disjoint union of trees.
noun
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2
A growth of trees covering a large area. Forests exist in all regions of the Earth except for regions of extreme cold or dryness.
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(historical) A defined area of land set aside in England as royal hunting ground or for other privileged use; all such areas.
noun
3
2
To plant with trees; change into a forest; afforest.
verb
3
4
A dense collection of trees covering a relatively large area. Larger than woods.
noun
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4
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Any dense collection or amount.

Forest of criticism.

noun
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4
To cover an area with trees.
verb
2
3

Origin of forest

  • Middle English from Old French from Medieval Latin forestis (silva) outside (forest) from Latin forīs outside dhwer- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Medieval Latin foresta probably represents the fusion of two earlier words: one taken as an adaptation of the Late Latin phrase forestem silvam (“the outside woods”), mistaking forestem for woods (—a development not found in Romance languages; compare Old French selve (“forest”)); the other is the continuance of an existing word since Merovingian times from Frankish *forhist (“forest, wooded country, game preserve”) as the general word for "forest, forested land". The Medieval Latin term may have originated as a sound-alike, or been adapted as a play on the Frankish word (Gallo-Romans were often outraged by the King's exclusive hunting rights in the "outside forest". Emphasis to "outside" may have been an attempt to evoke danger, or to emphasise that the lands were banned from general note). Frankish *forhist comes from Proto-Germanic *furhisa-, *furhiþ(j)a-, *furhiją (“forest, wooded country”), from Proto-Indo-European *perkʷu- (“coniferous forest, mountain forest, wooded height”), and is cognate with Old High German forst (German Forst, “forest, wooded country”), Middle Low German vorst (“forest”), Old English fyrhþ, fyrhþe (“forest, game preserve, wooded country”), Old Norse fýri (“pine forest”), and Old Norse fjǫrr (“tree”). More at frith, fir.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English forest, from Old French forest, from Medieval Latin foresta (“open wood”), first used in the Capitularies of Charlemagne in reference to the royal forest (as opposed to the inner woods, or parcus). Displaced native Middle English weald, wald (“forest, weald”), from Old English weald, Middle English scogh, scough (“forest, shaw”), from Old Norse skógr, and Middle English frith, firth (“forest, game preserve”), from Old English fyrhþ.

    From Wiktionary

  • Latin forestem (“outside”) comes from Latin foris (“outside, out of doors”), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰwer- (“door, gate”), akin to English door. More at foreign.

    From Wiktionary